Bear (revenue Cutter)
The former revenue cutter Bear was sold to Adm. Byrd in 1931 for $1,000, serving as flagship of his second Anarctic expedition under the name Bear of Oakland. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1931, H.W. McCurdy Maine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 412.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
C.w.lawrence (u.s. Revenue Cutter)
Customs service celebrates two hundred years, Marine Digest Juy 15, 1989, p. 16. Seattle celebration features a full size replica of the C.W. Lawrence, the first revenue cutter to patrol the west coast. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Corwin (revenue Cutter)
The revenue cutter Corwin was sent to Bering Sea with orders to seize all vessels found sealing in those waters. The first seizures were the Thornton, Captain Guttormansen, the Onward, Capt. Daniel Munroe, and the Caroline, Capt. James Ogilvie. This act was the beginning of one of the most disgraceful and unjust policies to which the United States has ever been a party. These vessels were seized on the high seas, a territory universally recognized in international law as a free highway for the commerce of all countries. The Canadian sealers were engaged in a peaceful occupation when the Corwin swooped down on them, took possession of their schooners, turned part of their men adrift several hundred miles from their homes, without food or shelter; while others, masters and mates of the captured vessels, were thrown into prison and fined. After months of this confinement they were released, and, literally destitute, found their way back to Victoria. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Corwin (revenue Cutter)
The revenue cutter Corwin, Captain Hooper, was ordered to the Pribilof Islands with copies of the President's proclamation regarding the modus vivendi, for distribution to the interested parties and the commanders of the revenue fleet. E. W. Wright, A Brief History of the British Columbia Sealing Industry, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.436.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Grant (revenue Cutter)
The revenue cutter Grant was taken out of government service, being purchased by A. A. Cragen and resold by him to the San Juan Fishing & Packing Co. for $ 16,500. She was overhauled and rebuilt as a dory halibut fishing steamer, being the largest engaged in that trade, carrying more than twenty boats, with an operating crew of 40 men and a fishing crew of 30. Capt. Andrew Welding was placed in charge of the steamer. The old iron cutter was built at Wilmington, Delaware in 1871, being named in honor of the president then in office. Her last commander in government service was Capt. W. F. Kilgore, her final duty being the sad one of transporting the last bodies from the Valencia disaster from Neah Bay to Seattle for burial in Mt. Pleasant cemetery, a fund of $ 1,000 having been raised by the Building Trades Association of Seattle for that purpose. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1906, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 121.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Guard (revenue Cutter)
The small revenue cutter Guard patroled Puget Sound, primarily in an effort to discourage the smuggling of wool, opium and Chinese into the United States. Her efforts were augmented during the year with the election of Luther Weedin, Coupeville lumberman, as Island County sheriff. He declared war on smugglers and waterfront pirates, who made the isolated San Juans their headquarters, and eventually succeeded in breaking up the notorious smuggling headquarters which had existed for years on Ben Ure's Island in Deception Pass. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1899, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 51.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Guard (revenue Lanch)
The 17 -ton steam revenue launch Guard, with dimensions of 62 x 10 x 5.3 and fitted with compound (8, 16 x 12) engine, was completed by A. Biggs at Port Townsend and placed in patrol service on Puget Sound by the Revenue Cutter Service, operating from Port Townsend and Friday Harbor. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1896, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Guard (revenue Launch)
The steam revenue launch Guard was wrecked on San Juan Island in 1912, but was refloated and subsequently rebuilt as the commercial passenger and freight steamer Georgia. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 213.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jeff Davis (revenue Cutter)
The old revenue cutter Jeff Davis, which had become a prominent figure in marine circles on the Sound, was sold in January, Grennan & Cranny purchasing her for $2,920. E. W. Wright, The Oregon Steam Navigation Company's Best Days, Many New Steamers in Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.113.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jeff Davis (revenue Cutter)
The United States revenue cutters Joe Lane and Jeff Davis* were cruising in the Northwest, the former spending the most of the time in the Columbia and the latter on the Sound, where she remained until she was sold by the Government in 1862. *The Jeff Davis was sold in 1862 to Grennen & Craney of Utsalady for $2,920. They refitted and sent her to China, carrying as cargo a flat-bottomed sternwheeler, which was to be supplied with the engines from Tom Wright's old Enterprise, dismantled on the Chehalis. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.60.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jeff Davis (revenue Cutter)
It was a difficult matter to retain crews on any vessel while the mining excitement lasted, and many which came returned with a goodly portion of their men missing. The revenue cutter Jeff Davis, which was stationed on the Sound, made a trip to Whatcom in July, and every man on board except the captain deserted and went to the mines. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.72.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jefferson Davis (revenue Cutter)
James McCurdy, By Juan De Fuca's Strait., p. 66-67. Kautz, August V. Northwest journals of August V. Kautz, p. 46, 80, 122, 156, 195, 199, 227, 234, 277, 281, 283, 303, 305, 306, 314, 326. Cecil Dryden. Dryden's History of Washington. 1968., p. 225. Richard A. Seiber. Memoirs of Puget Sound and Early Seattle., p. 155. Richards, p. 242, 255, 263. Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., III, p. 381, 397, 406, 409.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Joe Lane (revenue Cutter)
Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 488. Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 47, 51.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Joe Lane (revenue Cutter)
Two well known Government vessels were sold at auction in 1869, presumably to enter the merchant service. One of them, the United States revenue cutter Joe Lane, fulfilled expectations, her new owner, J. Boscowitz, converting her into a handy little schooner, which he named the H. M. Hutchinson. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.176.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lincoln (revenue Cutter)
Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 147.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lincoln (revenue Cutter)
The U. S. revenue cutters Lincoln, Captain Hooper, and Reliance, Commander Sullivan and Chief Engineer Doyle, were stationed in the Northwest the greater part of the year of 1870. E. W. Wright, Remarkable Trip of the 'Shoshone,' Willamette and Columbia Transportation Enterprises, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.187.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oliver Wolcott (revenue Cutter)
Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians.,p. 37, 163, 164, 170, 171. James McCurdy, By Juan De Fuca's Strait.,p. 60,138.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oliver Wolcott (revenue Cutter)
The old revenue cutter Oliver Wolcott was retired from governmental service early in 1897, passing to the Pacific Steam Wahling Company for feeder service between Sitka and western Alaska as the S. S. Wolcott. A wooden schooner- rigged steam propeller, the Wolcott was built in 1873 with framing of Oregon pine. Of about 200 tons gross, her dimensions were 155 x 22, her last commander in government service being Lieut. H. Emery. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1897, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior, 1966., p. 25.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oliver Wolcott (revenue Cutter)
The United States revenue cutter Wyanda, well known in the Northwest for many years, was condemned and sold in San Francisco in November 1873 for $17,000, her place being filled by the Oliver Wolcott, built at the Bay City at an expense of $80,000. The Wolcott is one hundred and thirty-seven feet long, twenty-three feet beam, and ten feet hold, with a single engine thirty-four by thirty-four inches. She has been in service in the Northwest almost continuously since her completion, and in 1886 enjoyed the distinction of making the largest opium seizure ever reported, securing over three thousand pounds from the Idaho. She was for many years in charge of Captain Hooper, and M. G. Marsilliot was connected with her engineering department for a long time. E. W. Wright, Willamette River Locks Completed, Charter Rates of the Lumber Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.209.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Patrol (revenue Cutter)
The 62 -foot wooden revenue cutter Patrol was built at Astoria for customs duties there, being later transferred to Puget Sound as Scout (2). Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1903, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 90.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Richard Rush (revenue Cutter)
The former revenue cutter Richard Rush was sold by the U.S. government to the Alaska Junk Company of Seattle for $ 4,000. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 203.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Richard Rush (revenue Cutter)
The revenue cutter Richard Rush, the second to bear this name, was constructed by Hall Brothers and launched August 22d. Her dimensions are: length, one bundred and sixty-one feet ; beam, twenty-five feet depth of hold, fourteen feet. E.W. Wright, Marine business of 1885, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895.]., p. 330.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Shubrick (revenue Cutter)
Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., iv, 58, 110-111, 170,172. Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 48-51. C.T. Conover, Steamer played role in customhouse dispute, The Seattle Times. September 18, 1955. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 84. August Kautz. Northwest Journals of August V. Kautz, 1857-61, p. 209, 210,213. James McCurdy, By Juan De Fuca's Strait., p. 56, 69. Keith Murray. The Pig War, p. 40, 46, 50. Lucile McDonald. Swan among the Indians., p. 69, 83, 120, 124, 131. Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 40, 303-04, 308.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tacoma (revenue Cutter)
Tacoma will circle Horn, The Tacoma Daily Ledger. November 19, 1908, p. 6. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Thomas Corwin (revenue Cutter)
The revenue cutter Thomas Corwin was sold by the government early in the year, passing to J. E. Ryus of Whatcom for $ 17,025. Constructed at Portland in 1876, the Corwin had since been in continuous service in Northwest waters, commanded at various times by Captains Hooper, Healy, Herring, Roth, Munger and Slamm. She brought out some of the members of the Greely and DeLong Arctic expeditions and, under Capt. Hooper, once cruised north to Herald Island, the most northerly point yet reached by a United States vessel. Lt. W. R. Reynolds, USRM, an officer on the Corwin landed on Wrangell Island on May 12, 1881, planting an American flag, while John Muir and Dr. E. W. Wilcox made a brief scientific survey of the island. Her most recent mission had been a search for the ill-fated Jessie party on the Kuskokwim River. She was replaced in government service by the 900 -ton composite cutter Daniel Manning, an 18knot vessel buut at Boston in 1897. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1899, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Thomas Corwin (revenue Cutter)
The most important vessel built in the Northwest in 1876 was the revenue cutter Thomas Corwin, launched at Albina, Or., August 23d. The Corwin is one hundred and fifty feet long, twenty-four feet beam, and twelve feet hold, and cost $92,000. As she was the first Government vessel constructed in the state of Oregon, the occasion of her launch brought forth an immense crowd of spectators. The Corwin is still in active service, and for several years past has spent the summer in Bering Sea looking after the sealing interests. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.245.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Thomas Corwin (us Revenue Cutter)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 246.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library