Alsternixe
(Bark) - German bark, 3039 tons, stranded in heavy weather at dusk, February 9, 1903, one and one half miles southwest of Cape Disappointment Light. Complement of the vessel, including Captain Richard Auhagen, were rescued the following morning by the lifesaving crew. Several weeks later the vessel was refloated after earlier having been considered a total loss. The four-masted bark, valued at $90,000, hailed from Hamburg, and ivas one of the few large ships to escape the sands of Peacock Spit. The stranding was attributed to the vessel getting out of the marked channel. James Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Barry K (stern Wheeler)
The stern-wheeler Barry K, originally the Lewiston of the Union Pacific Railroad's Snake River fleet, was dismantled in Alaska after being retired from Alaska RaUroad service. The steamer's bronze chime whistle, originally on the famous Columbia River packet Hassalo, was returned to Portland from Anchorage at the behest of Harold Gill, Portland business man, former seaman on the wooden square-rigger Berlin and steamboat enthusiast. It was installed on the stern-wheeler Claire by Chief Engineer Harold Colson, after which President Pex Gault of Western Transportation Co. invited Mr. Gill to ride the Claire and blow the organ-toned whistle for the Morrison Bridge. ' When the Claire was subsequently dismantled the Hassalo whistle was passed on to the Shaver Transportation Co. for installation on the steamer Henderson replacing the original whistle of that vessel, which had been stolen while lying on deck awaiting reinstallation following repairs. During an extremely cold winter the Hassalo whistle froze and when
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Barry K (sternwheeler)
Barry K (ex-Lewiston of 1923), stern-wheel steamer operated since 1940 as a Willamette and Columbia River towboat by the Western Transportation Co. of Portland, sold to the Army for operation in connection with Alaska Railroad feeder service on the Yukon and Tanana Rivers. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 517.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Beaver (stern Wheeler)
The stern-wheel steamer Beaver, originally the historic G. W. Shaver of the Peoples's Freighting Company having been operated on the Portland-Umatilla route since her acquisition with the other assets of the Hosford Transportation Co., foundered at Canoe Encampment Rapids on the Columbia and was beached and dismantled on the Washington side, where the remains of her hull are still visible, but will soon be covered by the waters of the John Day Dam. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1934, H. W. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966,, p. 432.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Beaver (sternwheeler)
Also known as the G. W. Shaver, owned by Peoples Transportation Co., foundered at Canoe Rapids on the Columbia. Her remains were covered by the waters of the John Day Dam. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bismark (sternwheeler)
1898 Sternwheeler, 104'x 20'x 4.4', engine 11 x 361, 191 tons, built in 1892 at Woodland, Washington and supposedly very poorly constructed. She went for a total loss on the Willamette for unknown reasons. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bonanza (sternwheeler)
1888 Sternwheeler, 651 tons, 152' long, owned by Oregon Steam Navigation Co., built in 1875 at Oregon City to replace the Albany. She sank once at Rock Island where she stayed under three months before being raised. She then went down for the count after hitting a rock at Wallings on the Willamette, and was stripped and abandoned. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Boneta (sternwheeler)
1905 Sternwheeler,96'xl6',built by Johnson for the White Star Navigation Co. of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Under Captain Reynolds, the ship was rammed by her rival Idaho just above the 0. W. R. & N. bridge on the St. Joe. Nothing was proved at the trial held to determine the cause of her sinking. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bonita (sternwheeler)
December 7, 1892 Sternwheel, 527 tons, 155' long. She encountered a gale while en route Portland and Cascades and driven upon Fashion Reef. The 17 year old vessel under Captain Gus Pillsbury became a total loss. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brick (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 204.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Camano (sternwheeler)
May 27, 1902 Sternwheeler, 59 tons, 90'long, put into service in 1898 by Captain E. H. McMillan at Wenatchee, Washington. Under Captain Dwight Barrett, the ship and her 500 sacks of wheat stopped on her downriver run to take on wood at Entiat Landing. Upon leaving, she refused to answer the helm and listed heavily to port. Water entered the lower deck, which caused her to become even more unmanageable. She went on her side. The crew scrambled through doors and windows on the starboard side and 1 1 of them rode the ship in her undignified position for some distance through the swirling Columbia. One unfortunate soul slipped off and was drowned. At the same time, the life raft tore loose; four men, unable to climb the sides of the floundered vessel, grabbed the raft, but were not safe yet, for they became caught in the clutches of a whirlpool which sucked the raft down to the men's shoulders before it released its hold and allowed the raft to drift quietly into the shallows alongside the defunct steamer. Don Ma
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carrie Ladd (sternwheeler)
June 3, 1862 Sternwheeler, 128 tons, 126'x 24.4'x 4.6', two decks, built at Oregon City in 1858, owned by OSNC. Sank 18 miles below the Cascades. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cascades (sternwheeler)
Built at Portland in 1912, 407 tons, 160'long. Explosion and fire took its toll at Swan Island in 1943. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cassair (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1879. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles R. Spencer (sternwheeler)
July 12,1904 Sternwheel, sank fifteen miles above Hood River on the Columbia. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chehalis (sternwheeler)
Built at Tumwater in 1867. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205. Sternwheeler, the first up the Snohomish, Marine Digest. LVI (June 24, 1978).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chelan (sternwheeler)
244 ton, 125 foot long vessel. built at Wenatchee, Washington in 1902. Went under at the foot of 5th Street at Wenatchee, a total loss by fire on July 8, 1915. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chelan (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chester (sternwheeler)
Steamboating on the less populated Coquille and Umpquah Rivers, and on the Canadian Arrow and Kootenay Lakes continued for a number of years, although the shallow-draft sternwheeler Chester was laid up during the war years, ending river boat operations on the Cowlitz River.Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 308.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Latona (sternwheeler)
Built on Lake Union in 1890. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Shelton (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205. Archie Binns, Sea in the Forest, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Claire (sternwheeler)
Struck a submerged object and sank three miles below Camas in 1948 and later raised. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clara Brown (sternwheeler)
Brought provisions from Tacoma for Seattle fire victims in 1889, BNG, p. 265-66. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clatsop Chief (sternwheeler)
February 28, 1881, Sternwheeler built at Skipanon in 1875. The steamer Oregon (which seemed to resent the presence of other ships on the river) rammed and cut the Clatsop Chief in half at the Willow bar, sending the vessel and the ship she towed immediately to the bottom. Four drowned. Engineer W. S. Holmes went down with his ship, but felt his way along the engine room steampipes to the gangway, then along the earlings to a door and managed to come to the surface. W. E. Mitchell captained the ship at the time of the accident. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Columbia (sternwheeler)
1894 Sternwheeler built at Little Dalles in 1891. The 529 ton, 153' long ship burned in 1894. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Comet (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Constantine (sternwheeler)
Built at Port Blakely in 1898. Newell Inland Sea, p. 205. Four steamboats built for Captain Troup, Marine Digest. June 11, 1983, p. 11+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Corvallis (sternwheeler)
Built in Portland in 1877. The 100 footer was lost on the Columbia in 1896.Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cowlitz (sternwheeler)
99 ton vessel 109'long, built at Portland in 1917. She was bound downstream from The Dalles with a full cargo of wheat under a severe buffeting by a 25 mph upstream gale that poured tons of water over her bow, which raced across the deck and managed to find access into her engine room in September of 1931. The fires hissed out and the totally helpless ship went under. Fortunately, her superstructure wrenched free; the crew scrambled aboard and rode it for more than an hour before rescue Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
D. R. Campbell (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dalles City (sternwheeler)
September 14, 1912. Sternwheel. Those acquainted with the Columbia River Gorge will appreciate that a steamboat can be wrecked by a sandstorm, and that is exactly what happened to the Dalles City. Totally blinded by stinging sand and opaque-etched pilothouse windows, her skipper ran the steamer ashore at Stevenson, on the Washington side. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dalton (sternwheeler)
Built at Port Blakely in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206. Four steamboats built for Captain Troup, Marine Digest. June 11, 1983. The Canadian Pacific Comes to Port Blakely, The Sea Chest. September, 1978.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Despatch (sternwheeler)
Built at Port Madison in 1876. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206. James McCurdy, By Juan De Fuca's Strait., p. 278. Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 13, 18, 82, 127.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Diamond 0 (sternwheeler)
April 25, 1934 Sternwheeler, owned by Drake, Henry and Richard O'Reilly, built in 1891. Captain William Maki. While towing an empty oil barge, she struck a bridge at Vancouver, rolled and sank upside down on a sand bar. Ship was valued at $35,000. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Diamond O (stern Wheeler)
On May 3 the stern-wheel steamer Diamond O., formerly the Dalles City, was in collision with the steamship Felix Taussig on the Columbia River near Kalama. An oil barge being towed by the Diamond 0. was lost with its cargo. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 357.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Discovery Iii (sternwheeler)
Nicols Brothers to built a thousand passenger sternwheeler for Alaskan River excursion operator, The Marine Digest. Novemer 22, 1986, p. 8.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dorothy Stern (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dot (stern Wheeler (replica))
Two interesting small craft took to the waters of Puget Sound during the year. The first of these was the Dot, a miniature stern -wheeler 40 feet in length built at Olympia as a pleasure boat for Joe Eppler of Seattle. The wooden paddler was powered by a 24-horsepower automobile engine which drove her at the respectable speed of nine knots. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 562.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
E.d. Smith (sternwheeler)
Built in 1893 the 89 ft sternwheeler wrecked at West Seattle (Newell 1966:83).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
E.n. Cooke (sternwheeler)
1890 Sternwheeler, 416 tons, 150'x 25'x 6' with an engine 16 ' x 60 , built at Oregon City in 1871. Captain W. H. Patterson lost her on the Clackamas Rapids. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eastern City (bulk Carrier)
The British bulk carrier Eastern City of the Reardon Smith Line broke a Vancouver loading record when she took on 660,800 bushels of wheat, weighing 17,700 tons, at Alberta Pool elevator in a single working day. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XLVIII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eastern Gale (steamship)
The steel Shipping Board steamship Eastern Gale was purchased by the Northwestern Fisheries Co. of Seattle and placed in the cannery trade in charge of Capt. W. C. Ansell as the Perry L. Smithers (in honor of the general manager of the Booth Fisheries Co., of which Northwestern was a subsidiary). Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1925, H. W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 363.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eastern Guide (steamer)
The steamship Eastern Guide, recently acquired by the reactivated Pacific Coast Steamship Co., resold to the Prudential Steamship Co. of New York, the company's Diamond Cement having proved adequate to handle the limerock cargoes from the quarries at View Cove, Alaska to Seattle. The Eastern Guide, laid up at Seattle for the past four years, carried a 3,500,000 -foot lumber cargo on her return voyage the East Coast. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1933, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 422-23.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eastern Oregon
Built at Chester, Pa. in 1883. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eastern Oregon (steamer)
The Oregon Pacific Railway were making great efforts to establish a seaport at Yaquina, and increased their fleet in 1887 with the Willamette Valley and Eastern Oregon. The latter was a light-draft iron steamship built at Chester, Penn., in 1883 for the Charleston & Florida Steamship Company, who intended her to enter the mouth of the St. John's River. She was christened the City of Palatka, but the yellow fever and the frost played such havoc with the tourist and orange trade that she was sold at a sacrifice to the Oregon Pacific. Capt. George Paton was her first master under this ownership, and in 1890 she was purchased by the Oregon Improvement Company. After making a few trips between San Francisco and the Sound, she alternated with the Premier on the Vancouver route until December, 1891, when she caught fire on the gridiron at Olympia, and everything except the bare hull was destroyed. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of th
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eastern Oregon (steamer)
The steamship Eastern Oregon was taken to the Sound in July and placed on the Bellingham Bay route in charge of Captain Green and Chief Engineer Sutton. She remained there until the following year, when she was burned on the gridiron at Olympia. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.379.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eastern Prince (of 1896)
See PRINCE LINE FREIGHTERS
Citation:
Echo Steam (sternwheeler)
This sternwheeler was under the command of Captain A. Ellingston. This little 66 footer went down in the Coquille, but was later raised. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edison (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elk (sternwheeler)
November 1857-60 Sternwheeler built in 1857 by Captain Chris Sweitzer, who died on the wreck of the Northerner. The Elk, servicing the Dayton-Yamhill run, exploded just below the Yamhill at Davidson's Landing. Her entire upperworks went, along with her Captain Jerome. Years later, he still regaled the local citizens with his tale of how, while in the air with a number of other objects, he looked through the smokestack and observed his pilot, Sebastian Miller, sitting on the bank where he had been thrown. Fortunately, no one lost their life. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elk (sternwheeler)
Another Willamette River venture this year was the building of the Elk by Capt. Chris Sweitzer, F. X. Matthews, George Pease, and John Marshall. She was a small sternwheeler intended for the Yamhill trade, and has always been remembered by steamboat men because of the terrific explosion which sent most of the craft skyward at Davidson's Landing, one mile below the mouth of the Yamhill. Capt. George Jerome was in command, William Smith, engineer, and Sebastian Miller, pilot. Captain Jerome was blown up in the air to such a height that it is averred that he looked through the top of the smokestack on his way down and saw Bas Miller sitting on the bank. He alighted in the top of a cottonwood, and for twenty years afterward pilots and captains on the Willamette took especial pains to point out this remarkable tree to tourists on the river. Fortunately, although several were injured, none was killed by the finale of the Elk. Dr. Cardwell of Portland and Berryman Jennings were directly over the boiler, and, altho
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ellis (sternwheeler)
Built at Ballard in 1891. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emerald Princess (sternwheeler)
Harbor tour busineses thrive in Seattle, new to the business this year, the Major Charter's sternwheeler, The Marine Digest. June 14, 1986 p. 11 + (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Emerald Queen (sternwheeler)
An old Queen may ply the Snohomish River, Seattle Post Intelligencer. October 13, 1984. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Enterprise (sternwheeler)
July 12,1915 Sternwheeler, 129 tons, 86' long, built at Wenatchee in 1903. Captain McDermott. Ship foundered at Brewsters Ferry. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Enterprise (sternwheeler)
February 20, 1873 Sternwheeler, 247 tons, 119'x 22'x 4', built at Gardiner in 1870, owned by Merchants & Farmers Navigation Co. Captain French sailed the steamboat to Portland and, while crossing the Umpqua bar, the vessel broke a steampipe, lost power and drifted into the breakers to become a total wreck. Her engines were salvaged and installed in the Beaver. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Enterprise (sternwheeler)
Soldiers for Point Chehalis, The Sou-wester. II (Spring, 1967), p. 3-8. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 744.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eva (sternwheeler)
Steamer Eva was Jewett's joy. A Gardiner Mill boat. W.F. Jewett and O.B. Hinsdale had interests in all river boats here at the turn of the century. Ralph W. Andrews. This was sawmilling., p. 98.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F. B. Jones (sternwheeler)
1907 Sternwheel, 303 tons, 143' long, built at Portland in 1901. Rammed and sunk by tanker Asuncion on lower Columbia River; abandoned at Portland in 1937. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
F.k. Gustin (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairhaven (sternwheeler)
The Puget Sound Navigation Company/La Conner Trading & Transportation Company owned the sternwheeler Fairhaven. She sank at Pier 2 but was later removed (Newell 1966:87, 89, Argonauts 1988).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fannie Troup (sternwheeler)
Sternwheeler, 229 tons, 124' long, built at Portland in 1864 by James Clinton and W. H. Troup, owned by OSNC. Captained by John W.Babbidge, she wrecked on the Cowlitz in 1874. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1874, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fanny Lake (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1875. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fidalgo (sternwheeler)
Part of the La Conner grain trade, the 110 ft, stern-wheeler Fidalgo capsized in a winter storm on February 1 1, 1923 (U.S. National Archives Record Group 41:50, Newell 1966:106, 343).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence Henry (sternwheeler)
Built at Ballard in 1891. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Frederick K. Billings (sternwheeler)
July 1900 Sternwheeler, 749 tons, 200'x 37'x 6', built at Celilo in 1880 and rebuilt several times. She finally foundered in the Columbia. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gamecock (sternwheeler)
June 28, 1898 Sternwheeler northbound under tow with the Staghound. Both ships ran into foul weather and became severely damaged while being towed by the Elihu Thompson. Only the Gamecock's cargo of wood kept her afloat long enough to bring her into the safety of the Columbia. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984, p. 127-34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gamecock (sternwheeler)
Severely and structurally disabled on the Columbia River bar in 1898. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p.167.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gazelle (stern Wheeler)
Built in 1881, the small stern wheel steamer Gazelle burned on the Stillaquamish River in 1885 (Gibbs 1955, Wright 1961:241, 295, 333, Newell 1966:113, 403, Straub 1979).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
George Burton (sternwheeler)
1948 Sternwheel. Hit a reef at the lower end of the Celilo Canal. The vessel was designated as a floating museum, but washed off in flood waters to sail over the canal wall and become a total loss. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Georgia Burton (stern
wheeler) - The stern-wheeler Georgia Burton delivered to The Dalles the previous year for use as a river boat museum, had lain neglected at the lower end of the Celilo Canal. Flood water came over the canal wall, floated the steamer over the wall and onto the rocks outside, where she broke her back and became a total loss. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1948, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 555-56.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Georgia Burton (stern Wheeler)
1947, the year which saw the launching of the revolutionary diesel Rampant witnessed the final voyage of another of the vanishing fleet of Columbia River stern - wheelers. The Georgie Burton built in 1906 as the passenger packet Albany and rebuilt in 1923 as a Western Transportation Co. towboat, pulled away from her Portland dock on the morning of March 20, her whistle being the traditional three-blast farewell to sentimental Portlanders who waited on the river bank to see her pass. At Vancouver, Washington, she tied up to take on a special crew of old-time river men. Capt. George M. Shaver, who had run the upper river to Big Eddy in the early days when the Shaver boats were on The Dalles run, was senior pilot. Veteran river masters took their turns at the wheel . . . Capt. Fidler, 17 years master of the Georgia Burton, Capt. Winslow, Capt. Manical, Capt. McClintock; all great names on the river in the days of tall smokestacks and thundering paddle-buckets. Judge Fred Wilson, noted steamboat historian, was pu
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Georgiana (stern Wheel Steamer)
Looking at the San Joaquin River as it is today, navigable only by launch or rowboat, its precious water drained away by numerous irrigation projects and the upriver Friant Dam, one finds it difficult to believe that when the little stern-wheeler Georgiana left Stockton, on May 1, 1850, on an exploratory voyage, she was able to get up as far as what was then known as Firebaugh's Ferry (present town of Firebaugh), 217 miles south of Stockton. Not being content to stop there, she tumed off into the Tuolumne River and got as far as Tuolumne City, a long abandoned dream of which only a few adobe bricks remain. Returning to Stockton, the skipper of the Georgiana was so elated that he announced regular sailings up the San Joaquin to landings that few people had ever heard of-Dunham's Ferry, San Joaquin City, Graysonville, Ward's, South Merced, Temple's Landing, Firebaugh's Ferry. Presently he was running much farther upriver, to Watson's Ferry and Sycamore Point, a distance of 272 miles. The Georgiana did a prosper
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Georgie Burton (stern Wheeler)
Sternwheeler on her last voyage, March 20, 1947 steaming up the Columbia to be berthed at The Dalles, HN, p. 110.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gerome (sternwheeler)
1905 Sternwheeler, aka Gerone, built at Wenatchee in 1902. She wrecked on the rapids of the upper river. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gleaner (stern Wheeler)
Tne stern-wheeler Gleaner of the Skagit River Navigation & Trading Co. was caught in the ice at La Conner and the Cary-Davis tug Sea Monarch, towing a huge log raft, and Columbia of the Chesley Tug & Barge Co. were stopped by ice in Saratoga Passage. They were freed by the Humaconna. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 350.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gleaner (sternwheeler)
Built at Stanwood in 1907. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Glide (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1883. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goldlouis C. Hunter. Steamboats On The Western Riv
Later named Active; second ocean vessel to land at Portland, Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 742. Purchased by Portland interests. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 652.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Great Eastern
Harold Underhill, Masting and Rigging., p. 226.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Great Western (1)
The "Great Western" (1) was built by William Patterson, Bristol (engines by Maudslay, Sons & Field, London) in 1837 for the Great Western Steamship Co. She was designed by the famous Isambard Kingdom Brunel and was a 1,340 ton ship, length 212ft x beam 35.3ft, clipper stem, one funnel, four masts (rigged for sail), wooden construction, paddle wheel propulsion and a speed of 9 knots. There was accommodation for 128 passengers aft and 20 passengers forward. Launched on 19/7/1837, she was the first steamer built specifically for the North Atlantic. She sailed from Bristol on 8/4/1838 on her maiden voyage to New York (arr 23/4, dep 8/5) and Bristol (arr 22/5). Between 1839 - 1840 her tonnage was increased to 1,700 tons and on 2/4/1842 she commenced her first voyage Bristol - New York - Liverpool. On 21/5/1842 commenced her first Liverpool - New York - Bristol run and on 11/2/1843 sailed on her last Bristol - New York - Liverpool voyage. Subsequently she sailed between Liverpool - New York - Liverpool until her last voyage commenced 1/11/1846 when she sailed from Liverpool to New York (arr 16/11, dep 26/11) and Liverpool (arr 12/12). She made a total of 45 round voyages. She was then laid up at Bristol until, on 24/4/1847 she was sold to Royal Mail Steam Packet Co. In 1855 she was used as a transport ship for the Crimean War and in Oct.1856 was sold and scrapped at Vauxhall, London. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.1,p.66]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 25 November 1997]
Great Western (2)
The "Great Western" (2) was built by Wm Pile & Co, Sunderland (engines by North Eastern Marine Co, Sunderland) in 1872 for the Great Western Steamship Line. She was a 1,541 gross ton ship, length 276ft x beam 32.8ft, single screw, one funnel, two masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 24-1st class and 252-3rd class passengers. Launched on 7/3/1872, she sailed from Bristol on her maiden voyage to New York on 5/6/1872. She commenced her last voyage on this service on 14/9/1875 and on 30/11/1875 transferred to the Valencia - New York service. On her second Mediterranean - New York voyage, she was wrecked on Long Island on 25/3/1876, with no loss of life.[North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.783]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 25 November 1997]
Great Western (collier)
The Great Western, an old-time coal carrier, was burned at the wharf at San Francisco in the Spring of 1882. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 302.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Greyhound (stern Wheeler)
The hull of the historic Columbia River and Puget Sound stern -wheeler Greyhound was hauled out on the ways of the Western Boat Co. at Tacoma, where it was repaired, caulked and repainted. Out of service for many years, the hull was in use as a mooring float at the Foss Launch & Tug Co. moorings. Gordon Newell,Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 353.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Greyhound (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 373. Archie Binns, Sea in the Forest, p. 112-113.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gwendoline (sternwheeler)
1897 Sternwheel, 98' long, built by Captain Armstrong in 1893. The Gwendoline followed the Ruth into Jennings Canyon; a log became caught in the Ruth's sternwheel, jammed it and threw her into the path of the Gwendoline. Both ships collided and sank. The Gwendoline was refloated. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harbor Belle (sternwheeler)
Built at Aberdeen in 1902. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 209
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harrison (sternwheeler)
This sternwheeler wasreported to be almost the same size as the Georgie Oakes. Burned at Brautigan's Dock, Coeur d'Alene. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harrison (sternwheeler)
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 154. Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 168-71, 181-82, 185.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harvest Queen (sternwheeler)
November 19, 1896 Sternwheeler, 846 tons, 200'long, built at Celilo for OSNC. She sank when she hit the piling of a fishtrap at Oak Point, 60 miles south of Portland. She was raised and worked until 1899, at which time her machinery was removed and placed in Harvest Queen II, the first Columbia River sternwheeler to be equipped with a radio (1924). Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harvester (sternwheeler)
Built at Stanwood in 1912, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 209.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harvester (sternwheeler)
A sternwheeler, the Harvester was struck by the adrift liner President Madison in 1934. Harvester sank but was subsequently raised and dismantled (Newell 1966:432, 205, Argonauts 1988, Struab 1979).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hattie B (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1906, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 209.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Helen Hale (sternwheeler)
1913 Sternwheel, 52 tons, 100' long, built at Kennewick in 1912. Lost by fire on the upper Columbia. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henderson (sternwheeler)
December 11, 1950 Sternwheel, towboat, built in 1912. While towing the decommissioned Pierre Victory to storage at Tongue Point, she struck a submerged object near the jetty at the lower end of Cottonwood Island. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henry Bailey (sternwheeler)
Built in Tacoma in 1888. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hercules (sternwheeler)
Wrecked at Three Mile Rapids at a spot known as Big Eddy where she tore out her bottom and sank in deep water in 1933. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hercules (sternwheeler)
January 5, 1934 Sternwheel, 560 tons, built in 1899. She foundered at Three Mile Rapids.Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hoosier (sternwheeler)
1853 Sternwheeler of a mere five tons at her birth and constructed, or assembled, from a lengthened ship's longboat and equipped with a piledriver's engine. On one occasion when the shaft broke, the engineer and a deckband Carried the pieces four miles into Salem for welding. The Hoosier was re-built innumerable times- each time she was cut in half for lengthening. Local jokers advised the carpenters to throw both ends away. At the time of her loss, her 6 1 x 20 ' engine was geared to 3 x 1. Captain Swain and pilot George Pease suffered much ridicule with their mechanical arrangement of a 3 x 1 which moved a spur wheel that (after an almost indefinite distribution of power) finally moved 2 or 3 sets of cogs connected to the drive shaft. She was heard buzzing long after she passed. Lost at an unknown location, if anyone cared. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hustler (sternwheeler)
Built in Tacoma in 1907. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 209.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Imnaha (sternwheeler)
1903 Sternwheeler, built at Lewiston in 1903, 330 tons, 124' long. Total loss. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Indiana (sternwheeler)
Built at Mount Vernon in 1889. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 209.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Interstate (stern Wheeler)
An effort was made to revive steamboat service on the Columbia River system by the Greyhound Transportation Co., which had the former Graham stern-wheeler Oregona of 1904 rebuilt at Vancouver, Washington as the freight-carrier Interstate, operating her between Portland, Longview and Kelso. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 349.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ione (sternwheeler)
February 4,1937 Sternwheel, 389 tons, 148'long, built at Vancouver in 1911, owned by Western Transportation Co. at a cost of $50,000. The vessel struck Copleys Rock, Clackamas Rapids, near Starkweather Chute in the Willamette. The collision tore some thirty feet of planking from her starboard hull. The crew lashed a barge to her wounded side in an attempt to keep her afloat and upright, but their efforts failed. She rolled while the men were transferring 400 tons of rolled paper products. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ione (sternwheeler)
Navigating the Pend Oreille River. Montana Magazine. XXVII (April, 1977), p. 21.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Irene (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 209.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. N. Teal (sternwheeler)
October 22, 1907 Sternwheel, 513 tons, 160'. She was the first lower-river steamer to reach Lewiston, Idaho. Captain Arthur Riggs, in the employ of the Regulator Co., attempted to control docking at Hood River in 1915 by renting space at the dock, tying up the largest barge he could find and thus effectively limit tie-up space for other ships. Open River Line tied the J. N. Teal to the offending barge, pulled the throttle wide and yanked the barge, along with several bitts and pilings, out to the river. A dock fight started, the sheriff arrived and the docks were once again opened to regular traffic. The J. N. Teal burned at Portland. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J. P. Light (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1898, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea,p. 209.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
J.d. Farrell (sternwheeler)
Sternwheel vessel of 359 tons, 130'x 26'x 4.5', built at Jennings, Montana in 1897. The very plush river steamer sported electricity and bathrooms. Captain McCormack lost his ship to a hurricane in Jennings Canyon in June of 1898. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
James Clinton (sternwheeler)
April 23,1861 Sternwheel. Sparks from a midnight fire in the warehouse and flour mills on the Linn side at Oregon City set this little gal on fire; she burned to the water's edge. She was the first steamboat in Oregon to be lost by such a cause. Her engines went into the Union. Built in 1856 at Canemah, she was the first steamer to ascend the Willamette as far as Eugene. She arrived amid much fanfare on March 12,1857, having dodged snags for three days above Corvallis. On her return voyage, she was loaded with wheat, the sale of which nearly paid for her construction. John Gibson Cochran, Leo White and James Miller captained her at various times. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jenny Clark (sternwheeler)
Built by Ainsworth and Kamm. Transferred to the Oregon Steam Navigation Company in 1862. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., II, p. 743.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John Day Queen (sternwheeler)
Sternwheel, 40'x 10'x 1', built in 1895 by Charles Clarno. As the only steamer on the John Day at Clarno, she served as a ferry until the bridge was built. Clarno attempted in 1897 to bring his ship downriver, but failed at the first set of rapids. The wreck occurred 109 miles south of the Columbia at an elevation of 1,290 feet, the highest steamboat wreck in Oregon. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Katie (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kiyus (sternwheeler)
1866 Sternwheeler, 140', built at Celilo in 1863. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Klondike (stern
wheeler) - Used on the Yukon River between 1937 and 1955. The S.S. Klondike II, The Beaver. (Autumn, 1982), p. 50-55.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kootenai (sternwheeler)
1898 Sternwheeler, abandoned and sunk at Three Mile Point. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kootenay (stern Wheeler)
The big Arrow Lakes stern-wheeler Kootenay was at Nakusp, B.C., where the 1,117-ton vessel had been built in 1897. Following the removal of her machinery she was converted to a houseboat. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
La Center (stern Wheel Steamer)
The stern - wheeler La Center' 85 x 16 x 4, with 12-inch draft when loaded to a capacity of 45 tons of freight, was built at La Center, Washington in 1912 fo E.C. and U. S. Brothers and P. Moe, who had reached an agreement with the Lewis River Transportation Company owners of the Charm to handle frieght only on the Lewis River, the lattr vessel to handle passengers exclusively. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.,p . 206-07.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
La Center (sternwheeler)
Built at La Center, Washington in 1912. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea,p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lavelle Young (stern
wheeler) - The old Yukon River stern-wheeler Lavelle Young of gold rush fame was towed to Seattle in 1913 by the steamer Melville Dollar, where she was dismantled. She had been placed on the Kuskokwim River in 1910 by the Northern Navigation Co. for service between Bethel and the Tacoma, but had been replaced in that service by the Alice. The Melville Dollar, operated under charter to the Northern Navigation Co., was the only ocean-going steam vessel to have successfully navigated the Kuskokwim, the Alaska Steamship Company's Delhi having spent several weeks on a sandspit when she attempted it the previous year. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.232.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lena C. Gray (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1874. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Leona (sternwheeler)
1912 Sternwheel, 179 tons, built at Portland in 1901, 105', ex-McMinnville. Lost by fire on the Willamette. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Leona (sternwheeler)
Built at Portland in 1901. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lewiston (stern Wheeler)
The big wheat carrying stern - wheel steamers Lewiston and Spokane of the Oregon, Washington Railway & Navigation Co. were destroyed by fire while tied up at their Lewiston, Idaho dock on July 12. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1922, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 330.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lewiston (sternwheeler)
July 12,1922 Sternwheeler, 513 tons, 165', built in 1894 and re-built in 1905, both times at Riparia, Wash. She sank once in the Snake River Rapids and was raised. While tied alongside the Spokane, she and her neighbor burned at Lewiston. Logger 1938 Sternwheel, 156', 750 hp. Sank at Shaver mooring, Portland. Dismantled. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lily (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1881. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Linnie (sternwheeler)
Built at Utsalady in 1869. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lois (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1915, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Loma (sternwheeler)
Built in Everett in 1909. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lotta Talbot (sternwheeler. )
Built in Tacoma in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lucia Mason (sternwheeler)
1891 Sternwheeler, 140 tons, 109'x 20'x 4.2', built at St. Helens, Oregon in 1883. The old gal worked the Lewis River for eight years, sinking now and then, but still making money until her final loss. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lurline (sternwheeler)
November 21,1906 Sternwheeler. Rammed and sunk by the Cascade at Rainier. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
M. F. Henderson (sternwheeler)
1911 Sternwheeler, 534 tons, 159' long, built at Portland in 1901 and owned by the Shaver Transportation Co. En route Astoria-Portland with a Standard Oil barge in tow when rammed by the Daniel Kern, a tug towing rock barges to the Columbia jetty. She capsized to her side in shallow water and was dismantled.Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Madeline (sternwheeler)
March 23, 1925 Sternwheeler. Snagged and sunk on the Cowlitz River near Rainier with the Oregon Agriculture College Band aboard; they barely escaped with their lives. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mame (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Marquis Of Dufferin (sternwheeler)
This sternwheel steamer, San Francisco for Alaska (for use on the Yukon River), in company with steamer Progress, broke up in heavy weather off Cape Beale, June 27, 1898. She sank and the survivors were transferred to the Progress. The vessel was valued at $41,000. Jim Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan de Fuca, Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary F. Gruff (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary F. Perley (sternwheeler)
Appearing on the Sound in 1888 the 104 ft sternwheeler was destroyed by fire in 1901 while lying at Alki Point (Newell 1966:72-76, Wright 1961:357).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mascot (sternwheeler)
Sternwheel, 299 tons, 140'long, built at Portland in 1908. Lost by fire in unknown location in 1911. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Messenger (sternwheeler)
Sternwheeler,136 tons,91'long,built at Empire City, Oregon in 1872. Lost by fire at unknown location in 1879. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Messenger (sternwheeler)
1876 Sternwheeler, 136 tons, 'x 20'x 6'with engines 12 x 36 Built at Empire City, Oregon 1872 by Captain M. Lane. Ship burned for a total loss in Coos Bay. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Messenger (sternwheeler)
Built in Olympia in 1876. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Minneapolis (sternwheeler)
Built in Tacoma in 1897, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Minto (sternwheeler)
CPR Ship. 830 tons. 162 foot long. Murray C. Morgan. The Columbia 134-137
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Monte Cristo (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mountain Gem (stern Wheeler)
The stern-wheeler Mountain Gem of 1904 was stripped and abandoned on the Columbia, as was the Olympian, formerly the Telegraph of 1903, her machinery going into the towboat Logger. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1924, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle : Superior Publishing Company, 1966 . p. 357.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Moyie (sternwheeler)
CPR ship, Murray C. Morgan. The Columbia p. 134.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Multnohah (sternwheeler)
Built in Portland in 1885. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211. Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 177. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 34.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Multnomah (sternwheeler)
Built by and for the Willamette Steamboat Company in 1885 for the Oregon City route the Multnomah was 143 ft long, with a beam of 28 ft, and a depth of hold of 5 ft 3 inches. She ran on the Oregon City route for a short time and then was placed on the run to the Cascades. During her Oregon career she was one of the fastest and most economical sternwheel steamers of her time. In 1889 she was sold to parties in Olympia and was taken around in August of the same year (Wright 1961:329). Under various owners, one of which was the Olympia-Tacoma Navigation Company, she was engaged in the Seattle-Tacoma-Olympia trade. On October 28, 1911, while entering Elliot Bay during dense fog, she was rammed and sunk by the steamer Iroquois (Newell 1966:88,197). Multnomah had been coming on a straight course from Duwamish Head toward Galbraith Dock (now Pier 57) when the collision occured, a location approximately two thirds of the distance from the bell buoy off Duwamish Head to her dock (National Archives RG 41:2, no.419). Th
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
N. S. Bently (sternwheeler)
December 25, 1886 Sternwheeler, 150'x 32'x 41/2', engines of 16 x 60 1. Captain J. L. Smith in command when she sank at Salem with 3,800 bushels of wheat. She was raised. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nasookin (stern Wheeler)
The former C.P.H. passenger and freight stern-wheeler Nasookin of 1913, having been retired from service by her former owners, was acquired by the provincial government of British Columbia. Her upperworks were cut down and her first deckhouse removed forward to fit her as an automobile and passenger ferry on Kootenay Lake. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1947, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 546.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nellie (sternwheeler)
Launched in Seattle July 24, 1876. Marine Digest. LVI (June 24, 1978). Built in SEattle in 1876. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea p. 212. Pacific Magazine. Little Nellie, it was the smallest in the Mosquito Fleet, December 2, 1990.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nelson (stern Wheeler)
Losses to inland vessels included the well-known old Kootenay Lake stern-wheeler Nelson, built at Nelson, B. C. in 1891 for the Columbia & Kootenay Steam Navigation Co. and later taken over by the C. P. R. The 496 -ton steamer, 134 feet in length, noted as the fastest vessel on the lake until the arrival of State of Idaho in 1893, was destroyed by fire while at her moorings. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W. McCurdy. Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 311.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nenana (sternwheeler)
Alaska sternwheeler to be retored. Built at Berg Shipbuilding in Ballard in 1933, The Marine Digest. July 16, 1983, p. 8+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Norma (sternwheeler)
1910 Sternwheeler, built at Huntington, Oregon in 1891 by J. D. Miller and Jacob Kamm. Captain W. P. Gray crammed the Norma full of staging lumber to ward off the blows of sharp rocks. He traversed down the Snake River in much the same fashion as the Shoshone and wrecked at the mouth of the Deschutes. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
North Star (sternwheeler)
April 1898 Sternwheeler, 250 tons, 130'x 26'x 4', built at Jennings, Montana in 1897. Wrecked in Jennings Canyon. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
North Star (sternwheeler)
July 8, 1915 Sternwheeler, 199 tons, 100' long, built at Wenatchee in 1907, owned by the Columbia & Okanogan Steamboat Co. She lay tied up and for sale at the foot of 5th Street at Wenatchee. Captain McDermott was interested in purchasing the ship, but had not yet closed the deal with her owners, who planned on paying the insurance premium on the rest of their fleet with monies received from the sale of the North Star. To their misfortune, a fire broke out on the North Star and quickly spread to their Chelan moored along side. A hot, July wind fanned the sparks and they soon devoured the next ship in line, the Columbia. By the time the fire department extinguished all the flaming ships, the Okanogan lay in ashes alongside her sisters. The distressed company hopelessly foundered when the Enterprise went to the bottom at Brewsters Ferry a few days later. Their last steamer, the St. Paul, went up in smoke later in the year. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrec
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Northern Light (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 212.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Northwestern (liner)
The 2,334-ton steel and iron coastal liner Northwestern (ex-Orizaba) of 1889, was bombed by Japanese aircraft on June 4 while moored at Dutch Harbor by Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co. as a floating dormitory. The wreck of this maritime veteran was beached there and later dismantled. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1942, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 511.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Northwestern (steamer)
Except for occasional operation by the stern-wheel towboat Claire of the Western Transportation Co., steamboat navigation on the Willamette River above Willamette Falls ended with the sale in 1939 of the Northwestern (ex-Grahamona) by the Salem Navigation Co. of Portland to Capt. Wallace Langley for the Alaska Rivers Navigation Co. of Juneau for operation on the Kuskokwim River of Alaska. The steamer was towed to Clallam Bay by the Arthur Foss, Capt. Vince Miller, and turned over to the Active Capt. L.H. (Leb) Curtis, for the 2,611-mile tow to Goodnews Bay. Capt. Lowell Smith was mate and pilot for the long and hazardous tow, which was made successfully. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 474.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Northwestern (steamer)
The old iron passenger steamship Northwestern of 1889 was acquired (by purchase of the Alaska Steamship Co.) by Siems-Drake-Puget Sound (a joint-venture organization engaged in Alaskan airfield construction and sponsored by the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co. of Seattle), joining the former Chesapeake Bay steamer City of Victoria in floating hotel service in the far north. The Northwestern was stationed at Dutch Harbor. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1940, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ocklahama (sternwheeler)
1886 Sternwheel towboat, 152'x 31'x 8', engines 21 ' x 72', owned by the Willamette Transportation Co., a subsidiary of the powerful OSNC. This hard worker had towed more ships than any other boat on the river. She sustained damage by the capsizing of the British bark Alliance at Portland. Okanogan 7/8/1915 Sternwheeler, 432 tons, 137' long, built at Wenatchee in 1907. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Old Settler (sternwheeler)
Built in Olympia in 1878. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 212.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Olympian (sternwheeler)
Another noteworthy effort to adapt steamboat transportation to the motor age was made by the fast sternwheeler Olympian, originally Capt. Scott's Seattle-Everett packet Telegraph. The Olympian was placed in passenger and freight service by the Northwestern Transportation Co. between Portland and The Dalles, departing Portland one day and returning the next her method of handling freight being a forerunner of modern roll on-roll off methods devised by Capt. F. Kruse, master of the Olympian. Loaded motor trucks were driven directly onto the steamer's freight deck at Portland and dispatched at the upriver terminus to provide door - to - door delivery. None of these efforts proved profitable, however, and by 1923 the last stern-wheel packet had abandoned the historic Portiand- The Dalles route. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 308.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Orient (sternwheeler)
1894 Sternwheeler, 587 tons, 154'long, built at Portland in 1875. She struck the Morrison Street bridge in 1893, sank and was raised. The following year she hung up on a rock in the Cowlitz and was left high and much too dry when the water fell. The crew attempted to get her off, but somehow managed instead to ignite her, a total loss by fire. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Otter (sternwheeler)
Built at Portland in 1873. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 212.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Pilgrim (sternwheeler,)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 213.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Port Simpson (stern Wheeler)
The stern-wheeler Port Simpson of 1908, idle since suspension of Hudson's Bay Co. Skeena River steamboat service in 1912, was sold to M. M Stephens of Prince Rupert. She was dismantled and the hull lay near the city for many years. The Hazelton of 1900, which ran with the Port Simpson until 1911, had previously been sold to the Prince Rupert Yacht Club. Also dismantled, her hull served as a clubhouse until 1924. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1915, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior,1966., p. 258.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Portland (sternwheeler)
Firms selected to remodel historic steamer and operate it as excursion vessel. Marine Digest, March 20, 1982, p. 2. Port of Portland still seeks home for sternwheeler, Marine Digest, November 27, 1982, p. 24. Sternwheeler to become excursion vessel; Port of Portland commission OK's project for conversion of steamer. Marine Digest, December 22, 1984, p. 23. (il) Port of Portland commissioners continue to work toward conversion of PORTLAND to tour boat; objections from Port of Cascade Locks, which operates new, smaller COLUMBIA GORGE sternwheeler tour boat. Marine Digest, May 18, 1985, p. 24. Portland's plans for sternwheeler: $2 to $4 million for conversion to tour boat, construction of dock at Tom McCall Park; lease signed, vessel to be in service in 1987. Marine Digest, November 23, 1985, p. 3+.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Puritan (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 213.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Queen Of The West (sternwheeler)
Built by Nichols Brothers Boat Builders of Freeland, Washington. Debut in Seattle in August 17, 1995. Second sternwheeler designed and built by Nicholas Brothers for the American West Steamboat Company a subsidiary of Yachtship Cruise Lines of Seattle for cruises on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. Marine Digest. LXXIV (September, 1995) p. 44..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Quickstep (sternwheeler)
Built at Astoria in 1877. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea p. 213. Roland Carey, Steamer Quickstep had many different owners, The Marine Digest. December 10, 1983, p. 11-14. (Built at San Francisco in 1875, rebuilt at Astoria in 1882, Came to Puget Sound July 1885. Brought load of provisions from Tacoma to the survivors of the Seattle fire in 1889. BNG, 265-66.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
R. C. Young (sternwheeler)
July 22, 1892 Sternwheeler, 108 tons, 83' long, built at Salem in 1892. Burned at Dove's Landing. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Regulator (sternwheeler)
January 24, 1906 Sternwheeler, 508 tons. After being hauled out and placed on the ways at St. Johns, she caught fire and exploded, killing two. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rescue (sternwheeler)
1867 Sternwheeler, 113'x 20'x 4'. Lost by fire while on the Cowlitz River en route from Rainier to Portland. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Robert Young (sternwheeler)
The Sternwheeler foundered on the Willamette River in 1934. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rogue River (sternwheeler)
November 16, 1902 Sternwheel, 80 tons, 66'in length, built at Portland in 1901. Wrecked at Boiler Rapids where her boiler is still visible. Captain Burns. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Oregon California Border, Chetco to Blacklock Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. p. 26-28
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rogue River (sternwheeler)
November 16, 1902 Sternwheel, 80 tons, 66'in length, built at Portland in 1901. Wrecked at Boiler Rapids where her boiler is still visible. Captain Burns. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Oregon-California Border. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 26-28.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rose (sternwheeler)
Sternwheeler the Rose plies the Columbia River, The Marine Digest. July 27, 1985, p. 23. The Rose, built in Astoria to look like a sternwheeler of a century ago, The Marine Digest. July 20, 1985, p. 24.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rustler (sternwheeler)
Built in Olympia in 1884. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 213.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ruth (sternwheeler)
1897 Sternwheel, 100 tons, 131'long, built at Jennings in 1896 by Louis Pacquet. She collided with the Gwendoline. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
S. G. Simpson (sternwheeler)
Built in Tacoma in 1907. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 214.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Saint Paul (sternwheeler)
1915 Sternwheeler, 208 tons, 116' long, built at Trinidad, Washington in 1906. Lost by fire on the Columbia. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Samson V (sternwheeler)
Snagboat Samson V opens as a maritime museum in New Westminster, The Marine Digest. December 24, 1983, p. 16. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sarah Dixon (sternwheeler)
January 18, 1912 Sternwheel, built in 1892, rated at 368 tons, 161'long, owned by Shaver Transportation Co. and named for Shaver's wife. After her explosion at Kalama which killed Captain Fred Stinson, 1st mate Arthur Monical and fireman Silas Knowles, she was rebuilt as a towboat and machine ship. The Sarah Dixon went up in smoke in 1926 at Portland. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Seahome (sternwheeler)
The Seahome (maybe Seaholm) was built as a sternwheeler at The Dalies, Oregon, and named the Mountain Queen. She was fitted with engine and boilers taken out of the wreck of the Daisy Ainsworth and ran the middle Columbia from 1877 to 1887. It was rebuilt into a sidewheeler in 1889 for service on Puget Sound, ran the Canal for a time and was later sold to San Francisco interests and put on the San Francisco Vallejo route until sunk in a collision with the General Frisbee. The Frisbee was later renamed the Commander, brought to Puget Sound and placed on the Seattle-Bremerton run during the boycott of the Black Ball Company in the early 1930s. Leslie Stevens, Boats on Hood Canal, memories of Leslie Stevens, Kitsap County History. Silverdale: Kitsap County Historical Society, 1977, Book One p. 30-31.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Seattle (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 214.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Seattle Number Three (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 214.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Seattle Number Two (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 214.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Selkirk (sternwheeler)
May 15, 1906 Sternwheeler, 223 tons, 111'long, built at Wenatchee in 1899, owned by Columbia & Okanogan Steamboat Co. Wrecked at Rock Island Rapids.Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Senator (sternwheeler)
May 6, 1875 Sternwheel, 298 tons, 132' long, built in 1863 by John Thomas at Milwaukee for the Peoples Transportation Co. The Senator sat quietly chuffing away waiting her departure from the foot of Alder Street, Portland, while Captain Dan McGill stood on the deck conversing with Clackamas County Legislator Joseph Locey. Fireman George Warner carefully checked his water gauges and crewmen Cosgrove and Crowley took in decklines as passenger Klaus Beckman watched the men going about their business. Suddenly the pilothouse to the king-post, including McGill, Locey, Warner, Cosgrove, Crowley and Beckman, was swept clean in one gut-ripping explosion. The Vancouver raced to the Senator's side and removed the survivors before the out-of-control vessel drifted into the current and beached at Albina. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Shoshone (sternwheeler)
November, 1874 Sternwheeler, 300 tons, 136'x 27'x 4.6', 6 ' x 48 engine. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Shosone (sternwheeler)
Ran the Cascades under Captain Ainsworth, North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, II, p. 102. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon., II, p. 547. Murray C. Morgan. The Columbia. p. 214-216. Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 123-24. Arthur Throckmorton, Oregon Argonauts, merchant adventurers on the western front, p. 271.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sicamous (stern Wheeler)
The large stern-wheel steamer Sicamous, laid up at Okanagan Landing since the substitution of tug and barge freight service for the former C. P. R. passenger route on Lake Okanagan, was sold by the railway company to the city of Penticton, B. C. for one dollar. The stately old paddler was moved to Penticton Pier, where she was converted to a floating museum, proving a major attraction to tourists in the Okanagan area. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 564.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sicamous (sternwheeler)
The Sicamous operated on Lake Okanogan, The Marine Digest. June 28, 1986, p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Skagit Belle (sternwheeler)
Skagit Belle at Seattle, The Tacoma News Tribune. October 1, 1961. Skagit Belle rounds Brown's Point, The Tacoma News Tribune. November 2, 1947, p. A-8, (il). Built in Everett in 1941. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 214.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Skagit Chief (sternwheeler)
Built for the Skagit River Navigation Company, for Sound and River, The Tacoma Times. February 18, 1935. Sinks off Grays Harbor in 1956 while being towed to Portland for conversion to a waterfront restauarant, The Marine Digest July 20, 1985.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Skagit Chief (sternwheeler)
Built in Tacoma in 1887. Later became the Port Orchard. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 213. Murray C. Morgan, Puget's Sound. p. 261 BNG, p. 282.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Southeastern (freighter)
The small freighter Southeastern, following her efforts to inaugurate Prince Rupertsoutheastern Alaska freight service, was chartered from P. G. Briggs by the Independent Salmon Canneries Co. and redocumented as a fishing vessel for service in Alaska waters during the season. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1948, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 555.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Southeastern (freighter)
The motor freighter Southeastern, idle for some months following charter service in the Alaska fishery, was sold at marshal's sale in Seattle, passing to the Del Mar Food Products Co. for $78,500. Following survey by Capt. A. F. Raynaud and repairs at Lake Union Drydocks, the former Prince Rupert -Alaska freighter was placed under the Peruvian flag and operated in southern waters as an ocean fishing vessel. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1949, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966., p. 563.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sovereign (stern Wheeler)
Built at Ballard in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea p. 214.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Spokane (stern Wheeler)
The big wheat carrying stern - wheel steamers Lewiston and Spokane of the Oregon, Washington Railway & Navigation Co. were destroyed by fire while tied up at their Lewiston, Idaho dock on July 12. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1922, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 330.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Spokane (sternwheeler)
May 1895 Sternwheeler, 400 tons, 125' long, built in 1891 at Bonners Ferry, Idaho, owned by Columbia-Kootenai Navigation Co. Both cargo and vessel destroyed by fire at either Kalso, British Columbia or Kelso, Washington. Most likely it occured at the British Columbia location. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
State Of Washington (sternwheeler)
June 23, 1919 Sternwheeler, built at Puget Sound in 1889, owned by Shaver Transportation Co., 605 tons, 170' long. Captain Harry (Casey) L. Chase, with Barge #93 in tow, sailed en route Astoria-Portland when his vessel exploded just north and slightly upriver from Tongue Point. The ship went down; pilot Perly Crawford sailed up, over the barge's mast to land in the water on her opposite side and the airborne boiler sallied forth on a 1000' trajectory. The fireman died. Six persons sustained injuries. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
State Of Washington (sternwheeler)
American sternwheel river steamer, 605 tons, destroyed by terrific explosion, June 23, 1920, off Tongue Point. The steamer was enroute to Portland, towing oil barge No. 93 from Astoria. Suddenly she was shaken by a terrific boiler explosion and six members of the crew were seriously injured and another scalded to death. The sternwheeler was so completely demolished that all that kept her remains afloat was the hawser that remained fast to the oil barge. Nearby vessels came to the rescue and removed the injured men. The steamer was valued at $40,000. Her master was Captain H. L. Hill, but the vessel was in charge of the river pilot who had relieved the skipper a few minutes before the explosion occurred. The State of Washington was built at Tacoma in 1889, and was one of the best known sternwheel steamers in the Pacific Northwest. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
State Of Washington (sternwheeler)
Built in Tacoma in 1889. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 214. Torger Birkeland. Echoes of Puget Sound., p. 27, 52-57. PM (January, 1890), p. 351. Exploded June 23, 1920 off Tongue Point in the Columbia River. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 184.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
State Of Washington (sternwheeler)
The State of Washingtott, sternwheeler, built at Tacoma in 1889, 449 net tons, 170.4 feet long, passenger and freight, supplanted the Perdita, Captain Holbrook was her captain for a number of years. He left her to try his fortune in Alaska, made his way to the Yukon Territory and was never heard of again. Captain Red Jack Aismore relieved Holbrook, and remained her captain until she was removed from the run and sold to a Portland, Oregon, interest; she was converted to a tug and served on the Columbia in that capacity until 1921 at which time her boiler blew up, blowing her bottom out. Leslie Stevens, Boats on Hood Canal, memories of Leslie Stevens, Kitsap County History. Silverdale: Kitsap County Historical Society, 1977, Book One p. 30-31.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Swinomish (sternwheeler)
Built at LaConner in 1903. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 214. A short history of snag pulling by the Corps of Army Engineers, The Sea Chest. March 1986, p. 92-96. Ralph W. Andrews. This was sawmilling., p. 110.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
T. C. Reed (stern
wheeler) - The American Tug Boat Co. stern-wheelers T C. Reed and Swinomish were stripped of machinery and laid up. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966 p. 521.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
T.c. Reed (sternwheeler)
Built in Seattle in 1918, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 215. Ralph W. Andrews. This was sawmilling., p. 82. T.C. Reed pictured on the Chehalis River, The Marine Digest. June 13, 1987, p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Telegraph (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea,p . 215. Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 307, 329, 330, 400. Collision with Charm in 1915 Emil R. Peterson. A century of Coos and Curry., p. 415.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Telegraph (sternwheeler)
While at her Coleman dock berth, the sternwheeler Telegraph was almost cut in two by the out-of-control liner Alameda in 1912. She was raised, repaired and returned to service between Seattle and Olympia (Newell 1966:89-90,175).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Telephone (sternwheeler)
November 20, 1887 Sternwheel steamer, 386 tons, a favorite and fast ship on the Columbia. She was underway with Captain U. B. Scott, 140 passengers and crew. The alarm of Fire! prompted Captain U. B. Scott to head his vessel toward shore just below Tongue Point near Upper Astoria. The engineer opened the throttle all the way while the remaining crew fought the stubborn blaze. The mud-slick flats received the racing steamer; she struck at 20 mph and continued across the flats sustaining little damage to her hull. Astoria put out the alarm and the pumper put out the fire. One man burned to death. The hull was saved and rebuilt. She eventually ended her days at San Francisco. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia Bar inside Tongue Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. 1984. p. 163-65.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Telephone (sternwheeler)
January 5, 1892 Sternwheeler, 386 tons, 172' long, built at Portland in 1885. She burned in 1887 and was rebuilt to. 500 tons, 200'in length. She sank after striking a revetment in the fog at the mouth of the Willamette. Her passengers were taken to Coon Island. The vessel eventually sold in San Francisco. Three Mile Point This is not the name of a ship or steamer, but is a location said to be the gravesite of several old Coeur d'Alene Lake steamers. Known as the Steamboat Graveyard, the area is believed to hold the bones of: Bonanza, Colfax, propeller steamer. Harrison, sternwheeler. NFI. Samson, tug. Saint Maries, tug, 85'. All were scuttled. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Telephone (sternwheeler)
November 20, 1887 Sternwheel steamer, 386 tons, a favorite and fast ship on the Columbia. She was underway with Captain U. B. Scott, 140 passengers and crew. The alarm of Fire! prompted Captain U. B. Scott to head his vessel toward shore just below Tongue Point near Upper Astoria. The engineer opened the throttle all the way while the remaining crew fought the stubborn blaze. The mud-slick flats received the racing steamer; she struck at 20 mph and continued across the flats sustaining little damage to her hull. Astoria put out the alarm and the pumper put out the fire. One man burned to death. The hull was saved and rebuilt. She eventually ended her days at San Francisco. Don Marshall, Ship Disasters, Columbia Bar inside Tongue Point, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 163-166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Telephone (sternwheeler)
Caught fire and was beached north of Astoria November 20, 1887, Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 184. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 317 and 354. Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 147, 153 North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest, II, p. 144, 156. Maritime memories, The Telephone operated on the Columbia River; built for speed, The Marine Digest. November 15, 1986, p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Thomas L. Nixon (stern Wheeler)
The stern-wheeler Thomas L. Nixon, 159 feet in length and of 515 tons, built at Pasco in 1888 for upper river railway transfer service, was dismantled, as was the famous old steamboat Almota, 157 feet in length and built at Celilo in 1876. Her freight capacity, considered immense in those days, made her a highly profitable boat for the Oregon Steam Navigation Co. and she is said to have earned $ 14,000 on one trip during the boom days. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1901, H.W. McCurdy, Marine HIstory of the Pacific Northwest. p. 72.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Toledo (sternwheeler)
1896 Sternwheel, 226 tons, 128' long, built in 1878 at Portland. Lost somewhere on the Willamette. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tourist (sternwheeler)
Tourist was the first Puget Sound Board to carry cars on the Navy Yard Route, The Marine Digest. September 26, 1981, p. 23. Maritime Memories, the Tourist, The Marine Digest. October 19, 1985, p. 6. Built in Tacoma in 1907, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 215.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tyconda (sternwheeler)
Built in Tacoma in 1901. Gordon Newell, Pacific Steamboats. p. 48. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Umatilla (sternwheeler)
1941 Sternwheeler, built at Celilo in 1928, 551 tons, 160'long. Lost at an unknown location.Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Umatilla (sternwheeler)
The Stern wheeler Umatilla of 1908 taken over by the Shaver interests with the fleet of the Will River Towing Co., was wrecked in Three Mile Rapids while in use as a freight boat on the upper river, but she was later refloated and placed in service as the flrst wheat boat to operate above Celilo Locks since the suspension of service by the Open River Transportation Co. She was subsequently operated for a time between Umatilla and Portland, and finally relecated to a standby role at the Shaver moorings in Portland, where she eventually sank and was removed and dismantled by Fred Devine. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1932, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.. p. 419.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Utsalady (sternwheeler)
Built at Utsalady in 1884. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea p. 215.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
W. T. Preston (stern
wheeler) - Also at Seattle, the Army Engineers' famous snagboat W. T. Preston, the only active stern-wheeler on Puget Sound, was fitted with new oil burners permitting use of light diesel fuel and reducing smoke emission well below federal and state air pollution standards. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.79.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
W. T. Preston (sternwheeler)
Ends 42 years on snag boat, The Tacoma News Tribune. December 31, 1935. Pay honor to Tugboat Captain, The Tacoma News Tribune. January 30, 1936. Sternwheeler returns, The Tacoma News Tribune. May 9, 1954. (il). Sternwheeler to watch, Sunset Magazine. (November, 1977), p. 24. Last Puget Sound sternwheeler, to be retired, The Marine Digest. July 11, 1981, p. 11. Sternwheeler faces retirement, The Argus. July 31, 1981. Letter from W. T. Preston's Captain, Virgil V. Welsh, Jr. asking help in reversing decision to retire the vessel, The Marine Digest. August 8, 1981, p. 29. Olympia Group hopes to keep the Preston paddling, The Tacoma News Tribune. April 21, 1982. Preston to be placed on display at Anacortes, adjacent to the Burlington Northern depot, The Marine Digest. March 26, 1983, p. 11-13. Lucile McDonald, A short history of Snag Pulling by the Corps of Engineers byu Rita Kepner, condensed by Lucile McDonald, The Sea Chest. (March, 1986), p. 92-96. (Other Snag Boats were the Skagit, the S
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
W.h. Pringle (sternwheeler)
W. H. Pringle 10/9/1906 Sternwheel, 575 tons, 166'long, built at Pasco, Washington in 1901. Ship foundered on the Entiat Rapids. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wasco (sternwheeler)
Built at Hood River in 1887. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 216. Robert H. Ruby and John A. Brown. Indians of the Pacific Northwest, p. 155. Plympton Kelly. We were not summer soldiers. 1972., p. 48, 52, 100, 108. Cecil Dryden. Dryden's History of Washington. 1968., p. 130.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Washington (sternwheeler)
Built at Vancouver in 1881, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea p. 216.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Welcome (sternwheeler)
Jan 11, 1907 Sternwheel steamer, 56', built in 1900 at Coquille bv S. H. McAdams. She became stranded at Myrtle Point. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Welcome (sternwheeler)
Roberts, p. 81. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 216.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wenatchee (sternwheeler)
1901 Sternwheeler, 77 tons, 79' long, built at Wenatchee in 1899. Burned on the upper river. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western (tug)
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 99.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Belle (barkentine)
The Western Belle, a barkentine of 275 tons, was built at Eureka by E. & H. Cousins in 1867, and was lost with all hands on her maiden voyage. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Sept. 20, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Belle (barkentine)
1867 Barkentine, 275 tons, built by E. & H. Cousins at Eureka in 1867. Disappeared with all hands on her maiden voyage en route to Columbia River. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Belle (barkentine)
The Western Belle, a barkentine of 275 tons, was built at Eureka by E. & H. Cousins in 1867, and was lost with all hands on her maiden voyage. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. Sept. 20, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Bride
The ship WESTERN BRIDE was built under Special Survey by Lloyd's Register of Shipping, in Kingston, New Brunswick, in 1854, by William P. Flewelling. 1066/1121 tons; 176.4 x 31.7 x 22 feet (length x beam x depth of hold); owned by Fernie Brothers, and registered at Liverpool [Frederick William Wallace, comp., Record of Canadian shipping : a list of square-rigged vessels, mainly 500 tons and over, built in the eastern provinces of British North America from the year 1786 to 1920 (Toronto: Musson Book Co., c1929).; National Archives of Canada, RG 42 Volume 1349, ** Original References Vol.# 138 Reel # C-386 Page # 12, and ** Original References Reel # A-439 Survey # 51; Lloyd's Register of Shipping, 1856-1857]. The WESTERN BRIDE had a very short career. On 21 June 1855, A. [or J.] Sinclair, master, she sailed from Liverpool for Melbourne, where she arrived on 26 September 1855, with 8 passengers, 377 assisted immigrants, and salt; on 3 November 1855, she cleared for Callao, in ballast [Marten A. Syme, Shipping arrivals and departures : Victorian ports, vol. 2: 1846-1855, Roebuck Society Publication No. 39 (Melbourne: [Roebuck Society], 1987), p. 332]. On 5 February 1856, she sailed from the Chincha Islands, with a cargo of guano, bound for Queenstown; on 8 March 1856, she struck a sunken rock about two miles from Baranca Point, in the Straits of Magellan, and sank. The following is an account of the sinking, taken from the Times, 4 September 1856, p. 5f: "DREADFUL SHIPWRECK. - The following particulars of the loss of the ship Western Bride are from the pen of Mr. Arthur Newson, a passenger: "The Western Bride left the Chincha Islands, coast of Peru, laden with guano, on the 5th of February, 1856, bound for Queenstown, Ireland. On the 26th we had strong winds with heavy seas from the south-west, in latitude 40 degrees south, longitude 78 degrees west. The ship then became very leaky, so that the pumps were obliged to be worked every hour; and when under double-reefed topsails the crew were kept constantly at the pumps. On the 27th the foreyard was carried away; strong gales still prevailing with very high seas and ship very leaky, it was thought advisable to bear up for the Straits of Magellan as the nearest place of refuge, which we entered on the 2d of March with a fresh gale from the west-north-west; weather thick and rainy, with sleet at times. At sundown attempted to anchor, but found no bottom, both anchors dragging with 75 fathoms of chain, blowing a hurricane, and a strong current carrying us down to the narrowest part of the Straits, as we thought to destruction. We were obliged to let go one anchor and chain, the vessel having twice touched the rocks during the night. Daylight at last came to our relief, and we proceeded onward to Port Famine, where we remained two days repairing in the harbour. We continued our voyage until the 8th at 2 p.m., when the ship struck on a sunken rock about two miles from Barranca Point, the wind then blowing very hard and sea high. The ship continued to strike very heavily until 4 30 p.m., when the force of the wind and the sea had driven her over the bank, and she floated again. On sounding the pumps we found 7 feet water in the well. The pumps were immediately manned, but the water gained so fast there was not even time to run the ship ashore, in which case part of the vessel might have been saved and our baggage also, there being barely time to launch two boats, in which we saved our lives with great difficulty. At 7 p.m. the ship sunk in 24 fathoms as soon as we were clear of her. At 9 p.m. dark, wet, cold, thirsty and hungry, we reached Baxa Point, on the Fuegian side of the Straits, having only a few soaked biscuits, no water, and the weather bitterly cold. We feared to light a fire lest we should attract the attention of the natives, who are well known by South Sea voyagers as cannibals of the worst description. In this wretched locality we remained five days, when seeing nothing but starvation before us, the sea having abated, we took to our boats, and rowed across the Straits, and after several days suffering the greatest agony from protracted hunger and the most excruciating thirst we reached a small Chilian settlement in Patagonia. The governor, a Dane, received us very kindly and did everything in his power with his limited means to make us comfortable, and his attention to our wants will ever be remembered with gratitude. On the 15th of May the United States' war brig Bainbridge, cruising in the Straits in search of the crew of the lost ship Manchester, having seen part of the wreck, and understood from the Patagonian Indians we were at the settlement, arrived and agreed to take us up to Montevideo, River Plate, having learnt that the crew of the Manchester had all perished but two. Our best thanks are due to the Chilian Government for their assistance to British subjects, and especially to the governor for his kindness, and also to the United States' Government for the assistance rendered by their vessel to us and to the officers of the brig for their kindness." Mr. Newsom has just arrived in Norwich." [E-mail from Michael Palmer - 26 August 1998]
Citation:
Western Comet (towboat)
Another Spaulding-designed towing vessel, Western Comet, was built by Albina Engine & Machine Works for Western Transportation Co. of Portland. The 122 x 35-foot river towboat, fitted with two General Motors engines of 1,500-horsepower each, was designed to push multiple covered barges on the Willamette, Columbia and Snake Rivers. Her pilot house is mounted on a pedestal structure with the pilot's eye level 39 feet above the waterline. The smaller Western Sun, 70 feet in length with twin 565- horsepower Caterpillar engines was built at the same yard and was also equipped with a raised pilot house providing a 32-foot eye level above the water. She was placed in service under Capt. Frank Newell. A sister tug, Western Mariner, was completed soon afterward by the same yard. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1967, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1976, p.XXXVIII.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Engineer (steamer)
Harry S. Drago. Roads to Empire, p. 30. GEAE, p. 58 Lloyd McFarling, Exploring the Northern Plains., p. 410.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Explorer (fishing Boat)
Tacoma vessel may make history, The Tacoma News Tribune. February 8, 1938, p. 1. (il). Marine festival here farewell to seine boat, The Tacoma News Tribune. April 25, 1938. 8,000 welcome Tacoma boat at Gloucester, The Tacoma News Tribune. June 9, 1938.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Home (schooner)
The Western Home, a two-masted schooner of 135 tons, was built at Maine Prairie, Sacramento River, Calif., by Ludwig Mortensen in 1874 for I. C. Merrithew of that city. She was later owned at San Francisco by D. Steffens, and was wrecked November 13, 1904, at the Coquille River, Oregon. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Sept. 20, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Home (schooner)
November 13, 1904 Schooner, 135 tons, two masts, built by Ludwig Mortenson at Maine Prairie, Sacramento, in 1874. Ashore on the north spit of the Coquille River. Don Marhsall, Ship Disasters, Blacklock Point to Tenmile Creek. Portland: Binford & Mort, 1984, p.42-46
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Home (schooner)
The Western Home, a two-masted schooner of 135 tons, was built at Maine Prairie, Sacramento River, Calif., by Ludwig Mortensen in 1874 for I. C. Merrithew of that city. She was later owned at San Francisco by D. Steffens, and was wrecked November 13, 1904, at the Coquille River, Oregon. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Sept. 20, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Hope
Catholic Mission boat in British Columbia. Agnes Rothery. Ports of British Columbia, p. 250.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Mariner (tug)
The 73-foot tug Western Mariner of Richmond, California, suddenly capsized and sank three miles of Yaquina Head on April 9 while en route from Richmond for Portland. The Yaquina Bay Coast Guard station responded quickly to the sinking tug's distress call. The three men on board were thrown into 50-degree water, but were able to right an overturned lifeboat, from which they were rescued by a Coast Guard helicopter. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.167.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Mariner (tug)
The 73-foot tug Western Mariner of Richmond, California, suddenly capsized and sank three miles of Yaquina Head on April 9 while en route from Richmond for Portland. The Yaquina Bay Coast Guard station responded quickly to the sinking tug's distress call. The three men on board were thrown into 50-degree water, but were able to right an overturned lifeboat, from which they were rescued by a Coast Guard helicopter. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1974, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.167.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Meteor (towboat)
Western Meteor, 108 x 34-foot pusher-type river towboat with twin Caterpillar diesels developing 1,125 horsepower each, designed by Philip F. Spaulding and built by Martinolich at Tacoma for Western Transportation Co. of Portland. Designed for multiple barge handling on the Columbia River system, Western Meteor set a new standard of elegance with indoor-outdoor carpeting on all decks in addition to the now standard formica-paneled, air-conditioned quarters and many other amenities unknown to the working tugboat men of a few years earlier. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1970, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.77.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Metropolis
The WESTERN METROPOLIS was a wooden side-paddle steamship built by F. Z. Tucker, Brooklyn, and launched in 1863, for George Griswold, A. Benner, William Wall, and others; contemporary reports list her as belonging to the firm of Benner & Brown. 2,269 tons as built (remeasured in 1865 at 2,092 tons); 285 ft 4 in x 40 ft 8 in x 23 ft (length x breadth x depth of hold); draft 16 ft; straight stem, 1 funnel, 2 masts. Her engine (75 inch bore; 12 foot stroke) had been built in 1848 by Merrick & Towne, Philadelphia, and had served two Great Lakes steamers, the EMPIRE STATE, built in 1848, and the WESTERN METROPOLIS, built in 1856--it is from this vessel that she took her name--new boilers, wheels, and general reconditioning by Morgan Iron Works. Described by a contemporary, Capt. George H. Norton, as a "very slow, clumsy, unwieldy, hard steering steamer". Chartered by the Quartermaster Corps immediately upon completion for $850 per day, and kept in continuous use from December 1863 until late January 1865. First voyage, New York-New Orleans; on the return voyage, seized the steamer ROSITA, with a cargo of munitions and liquor, and towed her prize into Key West on 29 January 1864. Spent most of 1864 ferrying troops and supplies between New York and Hampton Roads, in support of the Union Army's activities in Virginia; northbound, carried hundreds of sick and wounded. December 1864, loaded troops for the attack on Fort Fisher. 20 February 1865, single roundtrip (and first commercial) voyage, New York-Greytown, chartered to M. O. Roberts. April 1865, single roundtrip voyage, New York-New Orleans, chartered to H. B. Cromwell & Co. May-July 1865, New York-New Orleans, chartered by Quartermaster Corps. August 1865, single roundtrip voyage, New York-New Orleans, chartered to W. H. Robson & Co; returned with a record cargo of 3,000 bales of cotton. 30 September 1865, single roundtrip voyage (her only voyage for her original owners, Benner & Brown), New York-Apalachicola, Florida, returning with a cargo of cotton. November 1865, sold to Ruger Brothers. Originally advertised to sail for the Ruger Brothers' North American Lloyd Line to Bremen via Southampton on 17 March 1866, the WESTERN METROPOLIS did not sail until 28 June 1866. However, she had been refitted with paddle wheels that shed their floats in anything but a dead calm, and the WESTERN METROPOLIS was forced to turn around and put in to Boston, which she reached on 6 July 1866, before all the paddles were lost. After temporary repairs, on 10 July 1866, she sailed for New York (arrived 19 July), unable to continue the voyage to Bremen; laid up. Late 1866, together with the other vessels of the North American Lloyd Line, sold to Isaac Taylor's New York & Bremen Steamship Co. 7 March 1867, first voyage, New York-Cowes-Bremen (arrived after a voyage of 17 days). Continued to make eastbound sailings at approximately eight-week intervals. 24 August 1867, sailed from New York on fourth (and last) voyage for New York & Bremen Steamship Co; 8 September 1867, arrived at Southampton with a broken shaft; repaired at Southampton, and proceeded on to Bremen; on return passage, reached New York 6 November 1867, from Bremen 20 October 1867 and Cowes 22 October 1867, with 921 passengers; there had been 3 deaths on the passage: an infant, a case of delirium tremens, and a case of apoplexy. 30 June 1868, sold for $57,000; her new owner advertised her for sale for the rest of 1868 and all of 1869, without success. 1870, acquired by Merchants' Steamship Co, Frederic Baker, agent, for its New York-New Orleans service. 12 March and 9 April 1870, two roundtrip voyages, New York-New Orleans. 18 May 1870, Capt. H. S. Quick, sailed from New York for Havre-Bremen-Copenhagen-Swinemunde-Kiel-Christiansand, chartered to Ruger Brothers. Returned by the northern route, arriving New York 7 July 1870, with 954 passengers; from the Shetlands to Newfoundland the weather had been cold and foggy: 3 infants among the passengers died, as did one sailor, of pneumonia. September 1870, returned to New York-New Orleans service. October 1871, port shaft cracked on voyage from New York to New Orleans; shaft replaced at sea. February-August 1873, laid up. 13 February 1875, last voyage, New York-New Orleans-New York (arrived 9 March 1875). March 1875, Merchants' Steamship Co ceased operations. 1875-1878, laid up; several changes of ownership reported; last sale to Cornelius Delamater, who bought her for $15,000. March 1878, at the Delamater Iron Works, on the North River side of Manhattan, where her engine was removed. I have no information on her later history or ultimate fate [Cedric Ridgely-Nevitt, American Steamships on the Atlantic (Newark: University of Delaware Press, [1981], pp. 329-330]. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 29 August 1998]
Western Queen (steam Ferry)
The side-wheel steam ferry Western Queen, a woodburner built by The Dalles Ferry Co. in 1879 for operation across the upper Columbia from The Dalles to Rockland, was purchased by J. W. Curtiss for $8,000. The ferry had formerly been operated by a company of which he was one partner. This veteran river craft remained in service under various private owners until 1948, when the boat and franchise were purchased by Wasco County for $300,000. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1908, H.W. McCurdy Marine History ofthe Pacific Northwest. Seattle:Superior, 1966.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Shore
Western Shore, ship of 1177 tons, was a three-skysail yarder built at North Bend in 1874 for A. M. Simpson, T. B. Knowles and Captain J. W. McAllep, her master, costing $86,000. The ship was lost on Duxbury Reef in July, 1878, bound to San Francisco from Puget Sound with coal, and was insured for $50,000. Her performance at sea was a credit to her builders. In 1875 she sailed from San Francisco to Astoria in two days and a few hours, beating the steamer Oriflamme. In 1876 she went from Portland to Liverpool in 101 days, and in 1877 from San Francisco to Liverpool in 103 days and back in 110 days. She is also credited with a 97-day passage from the Columbia River to Liverpool, and the three fastest consecutive runs on record for this route. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Sept. 20, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Shore
Western Shore, ship of 1177 tons, was a three-skysail yarder built at North Bend in 1874 for A. M. Simpson, T. B. Knowles and Captain J. W. McAllep, her master, costing $86,000. The ship was lost on Duxbury Reef in July, 1878, bound to San Francisco from Puget Sound with coal, and was insured for $50,000. Her performance at sea was a credit to her builders. In 1875 she sailed from San Francisco to Astoria in two days and a few hours, beating the steamer Oriflamme. In 1876 she went from Portland to Liverpool in 101 days, and in 1877 from San Francisco to Liverpool in 103 days and back in 110 days. She is also credited with a 97-day passage from the Columbia River to Liverpool, and the three fastest consecutive runs on record for this route. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Sept. 20, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Shore
The ship Western Shore beat the steamship Oriflamme two and a half hours on the trip from San Francisco to the Columbia River. E. W. Wright, Loss of the 'Pacific,' New Transportation Companies on the Willamette and Columbia, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.237.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Shore
The largest sailing vessel yet constructed on the Pacific Coast was launched at Coos Bay in 1874 and was a production in every way worthy of the State which claimed her. She was christened Western Shore, was one hundred and eighty-six feet long, twenty-two feet hold, and registered 1,188 tons. She cost $80,000, A. M. Simpson owning one-half, T. B. Knowles and Capt. J. W. McAllep one-eighth each, and San Francisco parties the other fourth. No sailing vessel ever set afloat on the Coast made such a remarkable record for speed. In 1875 she left San Francisco a few minutes behind the steamer Oriflamme and arrived in Astoria two and one-half hours ahead, making the trip in a trifle over two days. A year later she established another record by sailing from Portland to Liverpool in one hundred and one days, and the next year made the trip to the same port from San Francisco in one hundred and three days, returning in one hundred and ten. In addition to her sailing qualities she had an enormous carrying capacity, but
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Shore (clipper Ship)
Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 220. Built in 1874. One of three full rigged ships built on the Pacific Coast. Grounded July 11, 1878.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Shore (clipper)
The Oregon clipper Western Shore was caught in a similar predicament at the same time, her master losing his life by a falling spar, but the vessel was rescued by the tug Richard Holyoke, Capt. John T. Connick. She was not so fortunate a few months later, for July 11th, while en route from Seattle with a cargo of coal, she struck on Duxbury Reef and went to pieces in short order. At the time of the accident the clipper was speeding before a strong wind, making twelve knots au hour, and when she grounded the entire bottom on the port side went out, the coal cargo slipping into the sea through the aperture. The Western Shore had previously had several hairbreadth escapes, and though she possessed great speed and enormous carrying capacity was never regarded as a lucky ship. Capt. A. M. Simpson, who owned one-half of the vessel, had his portion insured for $25,000, and Capt. J. W. McAllep carried an insurance of $6,000 on his one-eighth share. As soon as the vessel struck, Captain Hotchkiss and the crew took to
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Shore (steamer)
The Steamer Western Shore on the Fraser River, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 272.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Slope (steamer)
Norman R. Hacking and W. Kaye Lamb. The Princess Story, p. 338
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Slope (steamer)
Capt. William Moore launched the sternwheeler Western Slope in May [1879] for the Stickeen River. The Slope was one hundred and fifty-five feet long, twenty-six feet beam, and eight and one-half feet hold, with engines twenty by sixty inches. She left Victoria on her first trip May 26th in command of Capt. William Meyer and Engineer John Patterson, carrying 280 tons of freight, 200 passengers and 60 head of cattle. A year later Moore took the steamer to the Fraser, where she ran until 1882, when he became financially involved, and in January, 1883, she was sold at auction to Capt. John Irving, who afterward turned her over to the Canadian Pacific Navigation Company, and in their service she ended her days in the latter part of the eighties. The machinery was removed in January, 1891, and the hull converted into a barge. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Slope (steamer)
The steamer Western Slope, with which Capt. William Meyers made the initial trip about four years before, was sold at auction in 1883, Captain John Irving purchasing her. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1883, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895]. , p. 305.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Star (sternwheeler)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea p. 216.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Star (towboat)
The Western Transportation Co. towboat Western Star, a single-screw vessel with an 800-horsepower Enterprise diesel, was rebuilt and repowered at Floating Marine Ways in Portland. Two Detroit diesels of 1,350 total continuous horsepower were installed, driving twin screws, while maneuverability was improved by the installation of independently controlled flanking rudders. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1973, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.144.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Star (tugboat)
This American diesel tugboat, 28 tons, burned at Seiku, Washington, February 4, 1959. Built in 1920, the vessel was owned by R. A. Busacker of Tacoma. J.A. Gibbs, Shipwrecks of Juan De Fuca. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Sword
Built in Tacoma in 1920 for Sword Line. 4794 gross tones. 379.9 feet. #219567. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 92.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Sword (steamer)
4794 gross tons. 379.9 feet. #219567. Sword line. Merchant Vessels of the United States, 1945, p. 92.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Trader (motor Vessel)
Westerb Trader, 120-foot motor vessel, built in 1920 as the Casco, operated in interisland freight service from Honolulu as the Kailua, brought to Puget Sound by Capt. Harry W. Crosby, and operated during the war by the government in Aleutian supply service, purchased by the Washington Fish & Oyster Co. of Seattle and refitted as a refrigerated carrier for service between Point Williams, Alaska and Puget Sound. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1947, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 545.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western World
The WESTERN WORLD was built for the United States Shipping Board by Bethlehem Steel Shipbuilding Corp, Sparrow's Point (ship #4197), and launched on 19 September 1921 as the NUTMEG STATE. 13,712 tons; 163,1 x 20 meters (length x breadth); twin-screw propulsion, turbine engines, service speed 17 knots; accommodation for 260 passengers in 1st class, 300 in 3rd class; crew of 203. 1922, renamed WESTERN WORLD. May 1922, placed in the New York-La Plata (South America) Service (managed by the Munson Line). 1926, sold by the United States Shipping Board to the Munson Line. August 1931, stranded on Boi Point, near Santos; the 888 passengers and crew taken off by the Hamburg-America Line steamship GENERAL OSORIO; the WESTERN WORLD was refloated 4 weeks later. November 1938, taken over by the U.S. Maritime Commission from the financially troubled Munson Line. 1939, placed in service as the U.S. Army transport LEONARD WOOD. June 1941, taken over by the U.S. Navy as a transport. 1946, returned to the U.S. Maritime Commission; laid up. 1948, scrapped by Consolidated Builders, Vancouver, Washington [Arnold Kludas, Die grossen Passagierschiffe der Welt; Eine Dokumentation, Band 2: 1913-1923 (2nd ed.; Oldenburg/Hamburg: Gerhard Stalling, 1973), p. 118. -
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 10 February 1998]
Westerner (schooner)
Many vessels suffered serious although notfatal damages. The steam schooner Westerner, bound from Rainier, Oregon to San Francisco, was struck by a heavy sea January 9 while crossing the Columbia bar, losing part of her deckload and receiving damage from the floating timbers. She eventually freed herself and returned to Astoria under her own steam. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.231.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Westerner (steam Schooner)
he steam schooner Westerner (ex-Bee of 1904), which had been laid up at San Francisco since 1909, was overhauled and returned to service as the San Mateo by the American Finance & Commerce Co. of California. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 307.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Westernland (1)
The "Westernland" of 1888 was built by Laird Bros. at Birkenhead in 1883 and was actually built in a drydock as opposed to a slipway and was floated out on completion on 4/8/1883. She had a straight stem, two funnels, four masts, single screw and a speed of 14 knots. She was 5736 gross tons, length 440ft x beam 47.2ft and had accommodation for 80-1st, 60-2nd, and 1,200-3rd class passengers. She sailed under the Belgian flag on her maiden voyage from Antwerp to New York on 3/11/1883 and stayed on this service 1901 when she was transferred to the American Line and altered to carry 170-2nd and 1,200-3rd class passengers. She sailed on her first trip under the US flag from Liverpool to Philadelphia in May 1901. In 1906 she resumed service for Red Star Line's Antwerp - NY service for three round voyages and then went back to the American Line and made her last trip for them from Liverpool - Philadelphia in September 1908. She was scrapped in 1912.
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Ted Finch - 16 August 1997]
Westernland (2)
See REGINA (3) .
Citation:
William Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats On The Western
Steamer William Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers. on Slocan Lake, 1892. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 361.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Willie (sternwheeler)
Newell, Inland sea, p. 216.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wilson G. Hunt (sternwheeler)
The Wilson G. Hunt* also came up from San Francisco in August and ran between Victoria and Queensboro, as New Westminster was then called, connecting with the steamer Enterprise. Travel decreased so rapidly that the Hunt was withdrawn in October and returned to San Francisco. *The steamer Wilson G. Hunt was built in New York in 1849 for the excursion trade to Coney Island, but shortly after her completion was sent round the Horn to San Francisco, arriving there early in 1850. She was immediately placed in the Sacramento River trade, and proceeded to make a fortune for her owners, clearing in a single year over $1,000,000. After running there a number of years she went to Victoria in August, 1858, and ran for a short time on the New Westminster route. In October she was withdrawn and the following year plied on Puget Sound, replacing the steamer Constitution. Early in the sixties she was bought by the Oregon Steam Navigation Company and taken to the Columbia, and operated on the Cascade route in command of Cap
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Winema (stern Wheeler)
The Klamath Lake stern-wheeler Winema of 1904 was abandoned, rail and highway transportation having virtually put an end to lake navigation in that area. The Klamath of 1905 soon followed her, being laid up in the Pelican Mill Co. log pond, where her remains still lay as late as the 1950's. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1925, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966 p. 368.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Woodland (sternwheeler)
March 27,1926 Sternwheeler. Captain George M. Walker's command rolled 1 1/2 miles below Wilsonville and sank in 20'of water. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yakima (sternwheeler)
1875 Sternwheeler, 455 tons, 150'x 29'x 5', built at Celilo in 1864, a very elegant river steamer with 3 decks and 26 staterooms. Captain Coe steamed her from Celilo to Lewiston in 41 hours and 35 minutes in June, 1867, an amazing time in spite of running against the current and through many rapids. The Yakima, while heading downstream at John Day Rapids, hit a rock so forcibly that her bottom tore from bow to aft boiler and gave engineer Peter DeHuff the fright of his life. The ship was turned toward the Oregon shore, but sank. When raised, she proved too badly damaged to be of any further value. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library