B. F. Stone (tugboat)
The 65-foot motor tug B. F. Stone, with 350-horsepower diesel engine, was completed at Astoria in 1931. On Coos Bay, where a large fleet of small passenger, freight and towing vessels had been built in past years, no new construction of this type was recorded for 11 years after 1930. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1931, The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 411.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
B. F. Stone (tugboat)
The 65-foot motor tug B. F. Stone, with 350-horsepower diesel engine, was completed at Astoria in 1931. On Coos Bay, where a large fleet of small passenger, freight and towing vessels had been built in past years, no new construction of this type was recorded for 11 years after 1930. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1931, The H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 411.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bahada (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 204.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Barbara Foss (3) (tugboat)
The third BARBARA FOSS, a new and completely engine-automated tug, was built by the McDermott Shipyard Group in New Iberia, Louisiana for heavy-duty towing as part of the upgrading program to modernize the Foss ocean fleet. The tug is 120 feet long with a 34 feet beam. Upon acceptance by Foss, the BARBARA, under command of Captain Chuck Crawford, left Galveston, Texas for Seattle on July 5th, arriving three weeks later with no first-voyage miseries to report. The Barbara was put to work in three area of Foss interest, Alaska, Coastwise and Ocean work. Michael Skalley, The Barbara Foss (3) , Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 289.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Barbara Foss (tugboat)
The Barbara Foss was built at the Barbee Marine Yard at Kennydale, Washington in 1944. She was 117 feet long with a beam of 28 feet. She began work for the Foss company after World War II having been employed by the Army Transport Service. On May 21, 1973 the Barbara was transferred to Dillingham Tug and Barge in Honolulu and in the summer of 1975 was given to the Navy to be used in target practice. Michael Skalley, The Barbara Foss (2 Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 146.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Barbara Foss. (1) (tugboat)
The Barbara Foss (1) was built as the tug WEGO in the John Nelson shipyard of Seattle in 1925. She was launched on September 25, 1925 and was sunk May 31, 1942 on the Port Angeles to Seattle route. The remains of the tug were not found. Michael Skalley. Foss. One hundred years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Bear (tugboat)
December 12, 1950. Tug, owned by the Shaver Transportation Co. and skippered by Claude Burleson, built in 1947. While towing the Falcon she went under near the Hawthorne Bridge in 50'of water. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana, Oregon Shipwrecks.1984, p.203-208
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Blakely (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 204.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Blue Star (tugboat)
Built in Tacoma in 1892. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 204
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Boobla Mary (tugboat)
Ex UNS Launch no. 823. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Britannia (tugboat)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 51.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Broughton Straits (tugboat)
Built in San Francisco in 1942. Yarns of Ships, sailors and the sea, Marine Digest. October 5, 1985, p. 20+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Brynn Foss (tugboat)
In 1952 the Reliable Welding Works of Olympia, Washington constructed a 68 foot tug with a 21 foot beam vessel that was to be state of the art for the Foss Company. The Brynn Foss worked Puget Sound for Foss in Tacoma, and later in Everett and Bellingham. Her engine gave out in January of 1978 and soon thereafter she was put in layup. Michael Skalley, The Brynn Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 182.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
C.c. Cherry (tugboat)
Built in Seattle in 1896. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
C.c.calkins (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Calcium (tugboat)
Built in Seattle in 1904 as the Florence. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carita (tugboat)
While tied up at the Everett dock in 1889, the small steam tug Carita's boiler and engine exploded and the vessel was destroyed (Newell 1966:53, Barnard 1984, Straub 1979).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carl Foss (tugboat)
The Carl Foss was originally named Sound which was built as a cannery tender in 1912 at Anacortes for the Coast Fish Company of Seattle. After several ownerships until being purchased by Foss on December 18, 1940. Foss operated the tug in Puget Sound until sold October 6, 1969. She was sold to a company employee who named her the Jenny W. Michael Skalley, The Carl Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 122-125.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Carol Foss (tugboat)
The Carol Foss was built in 1958 at the Todd Shipyard in Seattle and completed by the Foss-Seattle yard. She is 84 feet long with a beam of 25 feet. She started her career on July 5, 1958 in the Seattle Harbor and was repowered in June of 1977. Michael Skalley, The Carol Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating, Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 192.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Catherine Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Martinolich Shipyard of Tacoma built the Pacific Master in 1967 for the Pacific Towboat Company. The ship began service in April of 1967 in and around Anacortes, Bellingham and Ferndale. Responding to the needs of the Alaska oil boom the Pacific Master went north and worked around the oil rigs as a tender. When Mr. Skalley wrote his book about the Foss Company the Pacific Master had become the Catherine Foss and was working in Tacoma as the prime assist tug for Foss for Tacoma harbor. Michael Skalley, The Catherine Foss (2), Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 244.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Catherine Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Martinolich Shipyard of Tacoma built the Pacific Master in 1967 for the Pacific Towboat Company. The ship began service in April of 1967 in and around Anacortes, Bellingham and Ferndale. Responding to the needs of the Alaska oil boom the Pacific Master went north and worked around the oil rigs as a tender. When Mr. Skalley wrote his book about the Foss Company the Pacific Master had become the Catherine Foss and was working in Tacoma as the prime assist tug for Foss for Tacoma harbor. Michael Skalley, The Catherine Foss (2), Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 244.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Catherine Foss (tugboat)
Built in 1899 in the Hanson Shipyard in Seattle as the steam cannery tug Kathadin. She was sixty-seven feet in length with a seventeen foot beam. She spent her career with Foss working on Puget Sound operating until November 5, 1964. The Catherine was sold in June of 1969 and in April of 1977 she was renamed Kathadin and taken to LaConnor. (Michael Skalley, The Catherine Foss, Foss ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 107).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Challenge (tugboat)
Built at Ballard in 1901. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles Counselman (tugboat)
Built in Ballard in 1900. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Charles H. Cates (tugboat)
A million -dollar fire on July 27, 1938, destroyed the Canadian Pacific Company's Pier D at Vancouver. Capt. Charles Cates, Capt. Malcolm McManus, Engineer Dave Mathieson, Earl Ward and Albert Ball took the tug Charles H. Cates across the harbor and rescued three firemen driven into the water when the 900-foot pier erupted in flame, the paint being burned from the tug by the intense heat. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1938, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 465.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cheakamus (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chris Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Chris Foss (1) was built as the Crest in 1925 at the Sieverson Shipyard in Seattle for the Wagner Towboat Company. The vessel was 51 feet in length and had a beam of 14 feet. Her primary service was on Puget Sound and she became part of the Foss fleet in 1937 when Wagner Towing was dissolved. After a checkered career with some years in lay-up without an engine Foss sold the tug in October of 1956. She once again became the Crest and did a variety of work on Puget Sound with plans for cruises up the Columbia and Snake Rivers as well as the Canadian islands. Michael Skalley, The Nancy Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 118.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Chris Foss (2) (tugboat)
The CHRIS FOSS, a steel harbor-class tug number YTL-159, was built for the navy in City Island, New York, but the tug wandered a long way from home, ending up in Puget Sound. She worked for the navy shifting barges and test equipment around the Sound for twenty years before being declared surplus in 1962 and laid up at Indian Island near Port Townsend. She was purchased by Foss in mid 1962 and a major rebuilding operation began being completed by the end of that year. The tug operated on Puget Sound and its final active day for Foss was June 9, 1980 after which she was put up in lay-up. Michael Skalley, The Chris Foss, (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 226.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Christine Foss (tugboat)
The Christine Foss began service as a Miki-tyupe Army tug, LT-187 built in 1943 at the Sagstad Shipyard in Seattle. After war service in the Aleutians the vessel was sold to the Foss company in April of 1946. The Christine has been involved in two historic tows. In 1957 she towed a rail car barge loaded with lumber from central British Columbia to the Midwest and Est the first of its kind. In January 1958 the Christine carried two barges loaded with dynamite to the Hawaiian Islands Michael Skalley, The Christine Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 149.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Astoria (tugboat)
Standing by 1898 wreck of the Mercury with the Resolute. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 49.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Bothell (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p.205.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
City Of Renton (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 205. M.S.Kline and G.A. Bayless. Ferryboats. a legend on Puget Sound., p. 146.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clara Foss (tugboat)
The CLARA FOSS, named for Clara Berg Wright, niece of Thea Foss, was an updated version of the CLAUDIA and CATHERINE, the first two C -class tugs. She was built by the Albina Shipyard in Portland to handle container-barges for the Foss Alaska Line run to Southeastern Alaska, but eventually, as the barges increased in size, she lost out to the big ocean class tugs. She is eighty feet in length with a twenty-five foot beam. Michael Skalley, The Clara Foss, Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 281.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Clara Foss (tugboat)
The CLARA FOSS, named for Clara Berg Wright, niece of Thea Foss, was an updated version of the CLAUDIA and CATHERINE, the first two C -class tugs. She was built by the Albina Shipyard in Portland to handle container-barges for the Foss Alaska Line run to Southeastern Alaska, but eventually, as the barges increased in size, she lost out to the big ocean class tugs. She is eighty feet in length with a twenty-five foot beam. Michael Skalley, The Clara Foss, Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 281.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Claudia Foss (tugboat)
The CLAUDIA FOSS named for a daughter-in-law of Sidney and Barbara Foss Campbell, was the first C-class tug built by the Albina Shipyard in Portland for Foss. The CLAUDIA and later the CLARA, were built to the design and plans of the time-tested CATHERINE FOSS. The three boats were intended for medium coastwise towing and general towing in Puget Sound. The tug was completed in 1968 and is 84 feet long with a 25 foot beam. Her major service is on Puget Sound having made some trips to both California and Alaska. Michael Skalley, The Claudia Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 263.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Claudia Foss (tugboat)
The CLAUDIA FOSS named for a daughter-in-law of Sidney and Barbara Foss Campbell, was the first C-class tug built by the Albina Shipyard in Portland for Foss. The CLAUDIA and later the CLARA, were built to the design and plans of the time-tested CATHERINE FOSS. The three boats were intended for medium coastwise towing and general towing in Puget Sound. The tug was completed in 1968 and is 84 feet long with a 25 foot beam. Her major service is on Puget Sound having made some trips to both California and Alaska. Michael Skalley, The Claudia Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 263.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Coeur D'alene (tugboat)
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 184.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Colonel George Armistead (tugboat)
Built in 1904 for the United States Army. Converted into a tug in 1942, renamed Agnes Foss, later the Celtic, still operating in the Philippines, Marine Digest. August 31, 1985, p. 6. (il). Agnes Foss began career as Colonel George Armistead which served as a mile layer during World War One, Marine Digest. August 24, 1985, p. 6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cordelia (tugboat)
January 19, 1878 Steam tug, 59.52 tons,valued at $11,000. She left San Francisco for Coquille River. She was found on March 5, 1878 adrift, bottom-up, off Vancouver Island, British Columbia. 5 dead. Don Marshall, Missing at Sea, Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binford and Mort, 1984, p. 183-186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cougar (tugboat)
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 184.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Craig Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Craig Foss was built as the Major Henry J. Conners in New Orleans by the Lester Alexander Company in 1943 for the United States Army for work along the Gulf Coast. Foss purchased the tug in September 1955 and she began service in February 1956 in Puget Sound and Alaska. The Craig Foss was sunk November 7, 1965 in Alaska's Cook inlet. Michael Skalley, The Craig Foss (1) , Foss, ninety years of towboating, Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 187.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Craig Foss (tugboat)
Four thousand horsepower single screw with variable pitch propeller ocean going tug, Marine Digest. LVII (October 21, 1978). Tug Craig Foss nearly sinks in storm off Coos Bay March 9, 1986, Marine Digest. (March 15, 1986), p. 3.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Craig Foss. (2) (tugboat)
The CRAIG, number LT-648, built for the Water Division of the Army Transportation Corps during World War II at Tamp Marine Corporation yards at Tampa, Florida, began her Army career towing on the Atlantic Coast and then shifted to the Pacific until laid up about 1950 in the California reserve fleet. She was declared surplus in March 1960 and put up for sale in July 1965. Foss purchased her as they had been on the lookout for a sizable tug to put on the Honolulu lumber run and the LT-648 appeared to be the answer. She was towed to Seattle and kept in mothballs until 1966 when repowering and rebuilding was begun. The tug is used along the Northwest Coast of North America including Alaska. After periods of intense work and lay-ups the Craig Foss was still in service when Mr. Skalley wrote his book in 1981. Michael Skalley, The Craig Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 237.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Cyrus Walker (tugboat)
Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 69-71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Daniel Kern (tugboat)
Jim Gibbs, Sentinels of the North Pacific., p. 109.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Daniel Kern (tugboat)
The Daniel Kern had the misfortune to lose another seagoing barge in 1917. On March 20 (prior to her sale) she was towing the Columbia Contract Company's 1,200-ton barge Columbia No. 38 north from the Columbia lover for Puget Sound when the towline broke, sweeping a seaman overboard from the tug and resulting in his death. The barge stranded near the Grays Harbor jetty and was considered a total loss, but was salvaged by being moved overland some two miles and relaunched in the sheltered waters of Grays Harbor. This remarkable feat identical in many respects to the salvaging of the Columbia River lightship, was accomplished under the direction of Daniel Kern of the Columbia Contract Co. of Portland. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1917, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 294.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
David Foss (1) (tugboat)
The DAVID FOSS named after a great grandson of Theodore, was fifth in the series of sister-tugs, commonly known as D boats. This tug was built at the Albina Shipyard in Portland, Oregon in 1967. The versatile D's performed equally well towing logs on Puget Sound, petroleum barges in Southeastern Alaska, or assisting in offshore oil support work. The DAVID's active duty began on June I 9th when she headed for Cook Inlet to work as a utility tug. She worked out of Anchorage until the freeze-up in October dictated her return to Seattle. After several years service in Alaska the David Foss sank on January 11, 1975 in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Michael Skalley, The David Foss (1) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 256-57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
David Foss (1) (tugboat)
The DAVID FOSS named after a great grandson of Theodore, was fifth in the series of sister-tugs, commonly known as D boats. This tug was built at the Albina Shipyard in Portland, Oregon in 1967. The versatile D's performed equally well towing logs on Puget Sound, petroleum barges in Southeastern Alaska, or assisting in offshore oil support work. The DAVID's active duty began on June I 9th when she headed for Cook Inlet to work as a utility tug. She worked out of Anchorage until the freeze-up in October dictated her return to Seattle. After several years service in Alaska the David Foss sank on January 11, 1975 in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Michael Skalley, The David Foss (1) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 256-57.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
David Foss (tugboat)
First of a new class of Foss Tugs, The Marine Digest. November 1, 1980. p. 11-12. Super D Class vessel. Foss ad with David Foss against a Seattle skyline. Marine Digest. January 31, 1981. p. 19. Marks first year of service, Marine Digest. October 3, 1981, p. 7. (il). Two tugs, the Oregon and the David Foss join the Grays Harbor towboat wars, The Marine Digest. September 28, 1985, p. 21-22.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dean Foss (tugboat)
The DEAN FOSS named for Andrew Dean Hager, grandson of Henry Foss, was sixth in the series of D-class tugs built by the Albina Shipyard of Portland, Oregon, and designed by Foss for intermediate towing, range and horsepower. Upon arrival in Seattle from the Portland shipyard in early May 1968 and after quickly passing a second inspection, she started right out on the Seattle to North Vancouver rail-car barge run but was later transferred to work in Southeastern Alaska. Michael Skalley, The Dean Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 263.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dean Foss (tugboat)
The DEAN FOSS named for Andrew Dean Hager, grandson of Henry Foss, was sixth in the series of D-class tugs built by the Albina Shipyard of Portland, Oregon, and designed by Foss for intermediate towing, range and horsepower. Upon arrival in Seattle from the Portland shipyard in early May 1968 and after quickly passing a second inspection, she started right out on the Seattle to North Vancouver rail-car barge run but was later transferred to work in Southeastern Alaska. Michael Skalley, The Dean Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 263.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Deborah Foss (tugboat)
The Deborah Foss was built in 1965 at the Albina Shipyard at Portland Oregon for Foss service on Puget Sound. She is 66 feet in length with a 24 foot beam. The propulsion is a Caterpiller (Twin) 1,200 horsepower engine. She had served in Southeast Alaska but is classified as a Sound tug. Michael Skalley, The Deborah Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 200.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Defender (tugboat)
Built in Tacoma in 1900. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206. Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 53, 55.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Delores Foss (tugboat)
The Delores Foss was built by the Albina Shipyard in Portland as the fourth of eight D class tugs designed for towing on Puget Sound and Alaska. The vessel is 66 feet long with a 24 foot beam. Her primary service has been in Southeastern Alaska and when Mr. Skalley's book was written she was still in service. Michael Skalley, The Delores Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 246.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Delores Foss (tugboat)
The Delores Foss was built by the Albina Shipyard in Portland as the fourth of eight D class tugs designed for towing on Puget Sound and Alaska. The vessel is 66 feet long with a 24 foot beam. Her primary service has been in Southeastern Alaska and when Mr. Skalley's book was written she was still in service. Michael Skalley, The Delores Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 246.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Diamond Z Ii (tugboat)
The 57-foot steel tug Diamond Z II of 160 horse power was built by Commercial Iron Works, Portland, from W. D. McLaren designs for National Paper Products Co. of Port Angeles, and the 48-foot Arrow No. 4 of 110 horse power by Arrow Tug & Barge Co. of Astoria. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 453.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Diamond Z Ii (tugboat)
The 57-foot steel tug Diamond Z II of 160 horse power was built by Commercial Iron Works, Portland, from W. D. McLaren designs for National Paper Products Co. of Port Angeles, and the 48-foot Arrow No. 4 of 110 horse power by Arrow Tug & Barge Co. of Astoria. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1937, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 453.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Diane Foss (tugboat)
The Diane Foss was built at the Albina Shipyard in Portland, Oregon in 1966 as number three in the D class of eight tugs. The tug was delivered at Seattle on May 28, 1966 for service on Puget Sound. The ship is 66 feet in length with a 24 foot beam. The Diane Foss has performed some service in Alaska but mostly out of Seattle. Michael Skalley, The Diane Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 248.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Diane Foss (tugboat)
The Diane Foss was built at the Albina Shipyard in Portland, Oregon in 1966 as number three in the D class of eight tugs. The tug was delivered at Seattle on May 28, 1966 for service on Puget Sound. The ship is 66 feet in length with a 24 foot beam. The Diane Foss has performed some service in Alaska but mostly out of Seattle. Michael Skalley, The Diane Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 248.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Discovery (tugboat)
Built at Port Townsend in 1889. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 206.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Donna Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Donna Foss was one of ten Miki-class tugs built for the Army Transporation service. She was completed in the Barbee Marine Yard at Kennydale, Washington in 1944. She was declared surplus by the government in 1946 and was acquired by Foss. She operated in Coastwise and Alaska towing until September 25, 1970 when she was sold to Philippine interests. One year before that in June of 1969 the Donna Foss became the Anna Foss and at the beginning of the Philippine venture was renamed the Bruin. This vessel was decommissioned in mid 1978 at Manila. Michael Skalley, The tug Donna Foss (1), Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 161.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Donna Foss (2) (tugboat)
The second DONNA FOSS arrived at Foss-Seattle from the Portland builder's yard in late September 1969, seventh in the series of D class boats. Built by the Albina Shipyard the Donna Foss is 66 feet long with a 24 foot beam. The vessel is used primarily on Puget Sound towing although she has been to Alaska many times. Michael Skalley, The Donna Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 267.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Donna Foss (2) (tugboat)
The second DONNA FOSS arrived at Foss-Seattle from the Portland builder's yard in late September 1969, seventh in the series of D class boats. Built by the Albina Shipyard the Donna Foss is 66 feet long with a 24 foot beam. The vessel is used primarily on Puget Sound towing although she has been to Alaska many times. Michael Skalley, The Donna Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 267.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Dorothy Foss (tugboat)
The Dorothy Foss was built in 1963 by the Albina Shipbuilding Company of Portland, Oregon. Her length is 66 feet with a 24 foot beam. She is one of eight D-Class vessels built for Foss and was the first built for Foss from keel up since 1958. Although used in Alaska for work at Cook Inlet much of her service has been on Puget Sound. When the Foss book was written in 1981 the tug was still in service. Michael Skalley, The Dorothy Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 233.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Drew Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Drew Foss was built by the Foss Company at their Tacoma yard in 1929. The tugboat was powered with a Caterpillar 325 horse engine. She was built following the plans of the Foss 11. Her primary service was on Puget Sound but was declared surplus on December 19, 1975 when her engine was removed. In 1977 she was cold to British Columbia interests and was named the Beverly Ann II. (Michael Skalley. Foss, one hundred years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 77.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Drew Foss (2) (tugboat)
The second DREW, fourth and last in her class of new Foss ocean tugs, was completed and ready for service at New Iberia, Louisiana by the McDermotte Shipyard Group in March 1977. The tug is 120 feet long with a 34 foot beam. Her primary service is Ocean towing and Coastwise Towing. Michael Skalley, The Drew Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 294.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Duncan Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Duncan Foss began her career as a U.S. Navy harbor tug built by th Victory Shipbuilding Corporation of Newport Beach, California. She was 63 feet in length with an 18 foot beam. A name change was made in October 1969 when the Duncan Foss (1) became the Elaine Foss. She was operated by Foss on Puget Sound until December 29, 1971. A major overhaul was planned but instead she was placed in dead storage. She was sold to Canadian interests and was renamed Cumshewa Chief. Sold some time later she was renamed Tania Too for service in the area around Bella Bella, B.C. Michael Skalley, The Duncan Foss (1) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 172.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Echo (tugboat)
Tugs Elk, Olympian, Echo together in the City Waterway. The Tacoma News Tribune. March 19, 1961, P. A-16.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edith Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Edith Foss was built as a combination tug and passenger vessel in New Orleans in 1919 and was operated by the U.S. Navy. Purchased by the R.J. Ultican Tugboat Company of Gig Harbor she was rebuilt in 1928. She was renamed the Rustler and later the Dauntless and when purchased by the Foss Company became the Edith Foss on September 26, 1946. When sold in 1969 to Mexican interests she left the Pacific Northwest as the Rustler. Michael Skalley, The Edith Foss (2), Foss Ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 139-140.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edith Foss (tugboat)
The Edith Foss was built in San Francisco in 1901 as the steam cannery tender Chilkat for use in the Alaska trade. She had a length of 115 feet with a 24 foot beam. She was purchased by the foos Launch and Tug Company on January 21, 1942 and became the Edith Foss. Her major work was in Alaska and on December 4, 1943 while bound for Seattle she was rammed by the Alaska Steamship Company vessel Victoria and sank near Prince Rupert. Michael Skalley, The Edith Foss (1), Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 125.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Edward Moran (tugboat)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 201.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elaine Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Elaine Foss (1) was built in St. Helens, Oregon in 1925 as the Larch for the U.S. Light House Service as a buoy tender on the Columbia River. She was purchased by the Puget Sound Bridge and Dredge Company in 1935 and was renamed the Loyal. The Foos company purchased the vessel in 1945 and after a major refit worked out of Seattle for the next twenty years. She was sold to the Annette Timber Corporation of Ketchikan and was renamed Trinity. On February 6, 1972 she sank near Prince of Wales Island in a storm. Michael Skalley, The Elaine Foss (1) Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 145.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eleanor W (tugboat)
Built in Tacoma in 1912. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elf (tugboat)
Early Olson Tugboat Company vessels in the City Waterway about 1912, Tacoma News Tribune. March 19, 1961, p. A-16.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Elk (tugboat)
Built in 1890. Formerly the Katherine. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ellen Foss (tugboat)
Foss Company's one and only ELLEN was originally the LT-57, built by the Army Transport Service for coastwise and ocean towing, though starting out life on the Great Lakes. She shifted from fresh to salt water shortly after her break-in runs. After war service the vessel was placed in the reserve fleet at Clatskanie, Oregon until purchased by Foss in August of 1962. She has operted along the Northwest Coast and in Alaska and occasionally to Hawaii. She was in service when Mr. Skalley's book was written. Michael Skalley, The Ellen Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 227.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Enola (tugboat)
Built at Ballard in 1902. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 207.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Erik Foss (tugboat)
Maritime memories, built in 1908, acquired by Foss in 1952, The Marine Digest. June 29, 1985, p. 6. This vessel was sold in 1979 and later renamed Gleaner. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Ert (tugboat)
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 97.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Escort (tugboat)
Jim Gibbs, Sentinels of the North Pacific., p. 169-170/
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Escort (tugboat)
Another fine tugboat, the Escort, was launched at Coos Bay and proceeded to San Francisco under sail to be fitted with machinery. E. W. Wright, The Alaska Purchase, Advent of Many Fine Steamers on Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Escort No Ii (tugboat)
The tugboat fleet was increased by the Escort No. 2, a Coos Bay production, which is still in service. She is ninety-two feet long, twenty-four feet beam, and thirteen feet hold, with engines twenty and thirty-eight by thirty inches. She was engaged in San Francisco for a few years after she was built, and, when the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company commenced tugboating on the Columbia River, went into their service in command of Capt. Daniel Graham, with Engineer Kelly, until 1891, when Eric Johnson was put in charge. Capt. George Pease, who had constructed the steanier Henry Villard for the Northern Pacific Railroad Company the preceding year, superintended, in 1882, the building of the Katie Hallett, a fine sternwheeler one hundred and thirty-five feet long, twenty-six feet beam, with engines from the McMinnville, fourteen by forty-eight inches. She was operated on Clark's Fork of the Columbia in construction work for the Northern Pacific Railroad. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1882. Lewis and Dryden'
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Eugene F Moran (tugboat)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 35.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fairfield (tugboat)
Built in Tacoma in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Falcon (tugboat)
Tug men rescued victims of 11th street street car wreck, The Tacoma Sunday Ledger. January 3, 1926 P. 6 E. Proud lady at sixty-one, The Tacoma News Tribune. January 14, 1962. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Fawn (tugboat)
One of the work boats out of Tacoma which is making good is the Fawn, owned by the Tacoma Tug & Barge Company, and skippered by jack McCullough. The Fawn was built last spring by Taylor & Grandy, the Burton boat builders and constructors of a fleet of fine Puget Sound boats. The Fawn is 48 feet over all by 11.6 beam and 5.6 depth. The power is a 50 h. p. 3-cylinder Imperial engine. She is arranged with fuel capacity of 800 gallons and 'fresh water tank capacity of 1000. The Fawn is planked with 11/2 stuff with sheathing of 11/4 fir. The timbers are 3x3 inch bent oak. (Western Yacht and Launchman. II (February 15, 1911), p. 37.).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Florence (tugboat)
Built in Seattle in 1904. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Flosie (tugboat)
Built in Tacoma in 1898. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Forest T. Crosby (tugboat)
Built in Seattle in 1912, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss 21 (tugboat)
The Foss 21 was built by the Tacoma Tug and Barge Company in 1900. as the Fearless. She was eighty feet in length with a nineteen foot beam. She was sold to Foss in February of 1925 and became the Foss 21 which worked Puget Sound and along the Washington Coast most of her career. She was purchased as the Fearless on June 13, 1966 and was sent to Alaska. Michael Skalley, Foss, Ninety years of Towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 56.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss 8 (tugboat)
The Foss 8 was built by the Wrang Shipyard of Bellingham in 1935. It was built with a 140 horse power Cummins engine and was 32 feet long with a beam of 11 feet. Known first as the Yamoto the tug was sold to Foss on July 25, 1938. After local port work she was laid up in 1972 and sold for work in Alaska where she is known as the Lou Ann. (Michael Skalley, The Foss 8, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 113.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss Eleven (tugboat)
The Foss Eleven was built by Foss in 1927 and planned for harbor work primarily around the Tacoma harbor. She had a caterpiller 230 horse power engine and as retired by Foss in 1974 when she was sold to Bellingham interests. The Foss Eleven was then called the Pamela J and worked for many years out of Blaine as a fishing boat. Michael Skalley, Foss, one hundred years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 67.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss Nine (tugboat)
Built in Astoria in 1907 as the Violet. Worked as a Tacoma Habor daybout and was sold September 11, 1968 to be used for a fireboat by the city of Renton and was renamed Snoopy. After several years Renton declared her surplus and she was drydocked on Hylebos Waterway in Tacoma. Michael Skalley, Foss Ninety years of towboating Seattle, 1991.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss Nineteen (tugboat)
The Foss 19 was built in San Francisco for use by the U.S. Government as the Steamer Wigwam patrolling the fishing areas of Alaska. She was later called Osprey and in the early 1920s was sold to Foss. She worked for Foss on Puget Sound until May 14, 1965 when she was sold and renamed the Kiowa and was used in Alaska. Michael Skalley. Foss 90 years of towboating. Seattle 1981.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Foss. Number Eighteen (tugboat)
Built in Alameda, California in 1892. Was known as Alice until renamed in 1919. Maritime memories, Tug Alice later Foss 18, The Marine Digest. October5,1985,p. 6 (il). Hull still floats at Anacortes marina after retirement in 1970, Marine Digest. October 12, 1985, p. 6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Garland (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gary Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Gary Foss was built in 1943 at the Reliable Welding Works at Olympia Washington for the U.S. Army. She was part of a series of sixteen identical turns for use in Army out-ports. She operated in Southeastern Alaska and was sold to Foss on November 12, 1948. Foss kept the vessel for a year and sold her to Pacific Tow and Salvage Company of Long Beach and they renamed her Pacific Rocket. The tug was later sold and renamed Bronco and still later became the tug Swinomish. Michael Skalley, The tug Gary Foss (1) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 165.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gary Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Gary Foss was designed by H. C. Hanson and built at Winslow, Washington for the Alaska Gold Mining Corporation in 1935. Named Trojan the the vessel worked until 1956 when she was purchased by Foss and renamed by the Foss Company. Sold by Foss in September of 1976 the tug was sold to California interests and became the Pacific Jupiter beginning work in January, 1977. Laid up the next year the vessel was eventually sold for work on the Sacramento River. Michael Skalley, The Gary Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating, Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 189.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Georgia (tugboat)
Built at Bellingham in 1914, Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gleaner (tugboat)
Built at Bandon, Oregon in 1908. The Gleaner, one of the old tugs still seen on the Seattle Waterfront, The Marine Digest. June 15, 1985, p. 7. (il). As she appeared after changes by Army Transport Services during World War II. After the war was purchased by Foss and renamed Erik Foss, The Marine Digest. June 22, 1985, p. 7. The Gleaner as she appeared as the Erik Foss, the 60th tug to join the Foss fleet, Marine Digest. June 29, 1985, p. 6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Go Getter (tugboat)
79 ton vessel from Garibaldi, Oregon, ran around on the south jett on June 12, 1952, She was salvaged, Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 168.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Goliah (tugboat)
Built in Philadelphia in 1883. Formerly the George W. Pride and also the Vigilante. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea p. 208. Maritime memories, the tug Goliah, Marine Digest. September 28, 1985, p. 6. (il). The Tugboat Goliah. Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 71-72.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Grace Foss (2) (tugboat)
The GRACE FOSS was completed in 1968 at the Pacific Shipyard in Anacortes, and was number eight in the series of modern steel harbor tugs built for Foss and their operating companies. Two sizes of tugs were planned in the modernization and replacement program-in the 37-foot class five were built and four in the 42-foot series, including the GRACE. The Grace is 42 feet long with a beam of 14 feet. Her primary service is within Puget Sound. Michael Skalley, The Grace Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 264.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Grace Foss (2) (tugboat)
The GRACE FOSS was completed in 1968 at the Pacific Shipyard in Anacortes, and was number eight in the series of modern steel harbor tugs built for Foss and their operating companies. Two sizes of tugs were planned in the modernization and replacement program-in the 37-foot class five were built and four in the 42-foot series, including the GRACE. The Grace is 42 feet long with a beam of 14 feet. Her primary service is within Puget Sound. Michael Skalley, The Grace Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 264.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Grace Foss (tugboat)
The Grace Foss was built as the Ollile S in Astoria in 1911. She was brought to Seattle in 1918 and was then called Rosedale. She was sold to Foss in November of 1927 and continued working until December 17, 1954 when she sank but was raised and sold. In 1974 she sank again, at Gig Harbor. Michael Skalley, Foss, one hundred years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 69.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Grant (tugboat)
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 154.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Gwylan (tugboat)
Built in Tacoma in 1902. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Harrison (tugboat)
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 154.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henrietta Foss (tugboat)
Marine Dig. 4/28/1984, p. 25. Henrietta is last of the wooden Foss tugs. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henrietta Foss (tugboat)
The Herietta Foss was built in Tacoma in 1931 and given a General Motors 165 horsepower engine. She was 49 feet in lenth and had a beam of 15 feet. When Michael Skalley wrote his book about Foss in 1981 the Henrietta Foss was tghe senior member of the Foss fleet and with the Christine was the only wood hull tug still operating under Foss ownership. (Michael Skalley, Foss, ninety years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 89).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Henry Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Henry Foss (2) was built as an Army Transport tug the LT-815 at Marietta Shipyard in Point Pleasant, West Virginia in 1943. This tug was purchased by Foss at a government sale in November, 1962 and for the next two and one half years was reconditioned at the Foss- Seattle yard. The vessel was 149 feet long with a 33 foot beam. It was used in Ocean and Coastwise work with severa long hauls. When Michael Skalley wrote his book on Foss in 1981 the Henry (2) was in layup. Michael Skalley, The Henry Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 230.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hercules (tugboat)
New Yourk harbor tug. Cornelius Brosnan. Jason Lee, Prophet of the New Oregon 159.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hercules (tugboat)
Brosnan p. 159.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hildur Foss (tugboat)
The Hildur Foss was originally a Puget Sound cannery tender named the Venture. She was built at Friday Harbor, Washington at the Jensen Brothers Yard in 1907. The Venture became a Foss tug when the Wagner Towboat Company of Seattle was acquired by Foss in 1937. The Foss name was added in 1940. She was ordered sunk in Commencement Bay April 1, 1949 Michael Skalley, The Hildur Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 116
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hoima (tugboat)
The Hoima was built in 1907 in Seattle and was used as a log and boomstick tow boat beginning with the Webster Towing Company who owned the vessel in 1923. The tug changed hands several times and worked for Gilkey Brothers of Anacortes eventually being purchased by the Pacific Towboat Company of Everett which brought the vessel into Foss ownership. In Febraury 1957 she was sold and began work in the San Juan Islands. Michael Skalley, Foss, ninety years of towboating, 1981.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hoonah (tugboat)
In September, 1961 Foss purchased all the tugboats belonging to the Delta Smyth Towing Company of Olympla, consisting of the linehaul tugs AUDREY and HOONAH, plus the harbor tugs OYSTEPMAN, PARTHIA, and RUFUS. Foss repainted the boats to their own identifying colors, green and white, but they retained the Smyth names. Delta V. Smyth, founder of the Smyth Company, started his tugboat career about 1910 working on the tug OYSTERMAN for the Brenner Oyster Company. Later on he purchased the tug and began a towing business in Olympia that lasted until the sale to Foss. Smyth owned and operated thirty-two tugs during forty years of tugboating, but at the time of the sale, the fleet was composed of only five vessels. The tugs were small and low powered compared to the average Foss tug in the Sixties and Seventies, so they were given only limited use. The largest tug in Smyth's fleet, the HOONAH, sixty-six feet in length was built in Bellingham in 1919, a wood hull cannery tender, for Pan American Fisheries. She remai
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Hornet (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Humaconna (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 209.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Imp, (tugboat)
Lone E. Janson. The Copper Spike. 1975., p. 111. Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 155.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Intrepid (tugboat)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 40, 161-162. Built at Ballard in 1900. Formerly the Charles Counselman. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 209.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Irene (tugboat)
Irene returns home to Sause Brothers, The Marine Digest. March 12, 1988, p. 22. (il)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iver Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Iver Foss was built for the United States Navy as the U.S.S. Canocan at the Everett Marine Ways, Inc. of Everett, Washington in 1943. She worked along the west coast and in Hawaii until 1958 when she was declared surplus. Purchased by Foss she became the Sea King on April 28, 1959 and operated in northern Puget Sound. In February of 1975 she became Iver Foss and worked for another year and was sold in February of 1978 to Alaska interests. There she was named Tagish and left for Alaska on May 6, 1978 under her new owners. Michael Skalley, The Iver Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 204.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iver Foss (3) (tugboat)
The Iver Foss was built and outfitted by Main Iron Works of Houma, Louisiana in 1977. Her length was 98 feet with a 32 foot beam. She was the fourth in the series of five MAMO II class tugs ordered by Dillinham tug and Barke of Honolulu. The Foss Ocean Division had entered the East and Gulf Coast towing market when the Iver Foss was ready for service and she worked in the Gulf port area until late in 1978 when she came home to the Pacific Northwest to work on Puget Sound. Michael Skalley, The Iver Foss (3), Foss, ninety years of twoboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 297.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Iver Foss (tugboat)
Built in 1925 as the Angeles and later the Marilyn. Sixty-five feet long. Gary Duff purchases classic tugboat Marilyn, Marine Digest. December 4, 1982, p. 8. (Operated as the Iver Foss from 1926 to 1974.).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jeffrey Foss (tugboat)
The JEFFREY, named for a son of Duncan and Claudia Campbell and a grandson of Barbara Foss and Sidney Campbell, completed trial ru ns and outfitting in June 1970 third in a class of 112-foot replacement tugs for the Foss Ocean and Coastwise Division. Upon acceptance of the JEFFREY by Foss at the McDermott Shipyard, Captain Joe Uskevich and his Seattle crew left Amelia on June 19, bound for Seattle. Considering the trip was a break-in voyage, everything went well, even the weather was cooperative and after a calm run up from Panama in thirteen days, the JEFFREY pulled into the Foss-Seattle dock, ready for action. The Jeffery Foss was assigned to work both in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest. Michael Skalley, The Jeffrey Foss, Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 273.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jeffrey Foss (tugboat)
The JEFFREY, named for a son of Duncan and Claudia Campbell and a grandson of Barbara Foss and Sidney Campbell, completed trial ru ns and outfitting in June 1970 third in a class of 112-foot replacement tugs for the Foss Ocean and Coastwise Division. Upon acceptance of the JEFFREY by Foss at the McDermott Shipyard, Captain Joe Uskevich and his Seattle crew left Amelia on June 19, bound for Seattle. Considering the trip was a break-in voyage, everything went well, even the weather was cooperative and after a calm run up from Panama in thirteen days, the JEFFREY pulled into the Foss-Seattle dock, ready for action. The Jeffery Foss was assigned to work both in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest. Michael Skalley, The Jeffrey Foss, Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 273.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jennifer C (tugboat)
New type tug, designed by Nils Lucander of Tacoma. The Marine Digest. September 25, 1982, p. 10. Three point design, maneuverable and economical. (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jenny Foss (tugboat)
The Jenny Foss was built in 1965 at the Martinolich Shipyard in Tacoma for the Foss Company as one of the J class of tugs. The all steel tug was completed and ready for work by mid April 1965 and has served primarily on Puget Sound. Michael Skalley, The Jennie Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 240- 41.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Jerry Foss (tugboat)
The Jerry Foss was buit in 1943 for the Ward Shipping Administration at the Gibbs Gas Engine Company of Jacksonville, Florida. She was 45 feet in length with a 14 foot beam. She worked mosly in and around Puget Sound especially at the Foss Yard at Ballard. Later assigned to Tacoma she operated only occassionally. Declared surplus on July 17, 1968 she was sold to the Annette Timber Company of Ketchika, Alaska and renamed Trinity II. Michael Skalley, The tug Jerry Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Joe Foss (1) (tugboat)
The first Joe Foss was launched by the Foss Launch and Tug Company in Tacoma in 1942. She was ready for service in October, 1942 and worked in the Tacoma harbor. She ended her career as a Foss towboat in August of 1972 and was purchased by the Peterson's Boatworks of Tacoma and given a new name, Little Toot. (Michael Skalley, The Joe Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. 144.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Joe Foss (2) (tugboat)
The JOE FOSS, built as the SAMISH BAY by the Pacific Shipyard of Anacortes, Washington was delivered complete in 1967 to Foss for use by Bellingham Tug & Barge. She was seventh in the series of the new harbor tugs ordered from Pacific Shipyard to provide better service for Puget Sound ports. The vessel is 42 feet in length with a beam of 14 feet. The SAMISH BAY, assigned to Bellingham Bay, worked steadily in general harbor service and log towing for the next six years. In October of 1974 the Samish Bay became the Joe Foss and at the time of the writing of Mr. Skalley's book on the Foss Company she was assigned to Port Angeles harbor. Michael Skalley, The Joe Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 259.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Joe Foss (2) (tugboat)
The JOE FOSS, built as the SAMISH BAY by the Pacific Shipyard of Anacortes, Washington was delivered complete in 1967 to Foss for use by Bellingham Tug & Barge. She was seventh in the series of the new harbor tugs ordered from Pacific Shipyard to provide better service for Puget Sound ports. The vessel is 42 feet in length with a beam of 14 feet. The SAMISH BAY, assigned to Bellingham Bay, worked steadily in general harbor service and log towing for the next six years. In October of 1974 the Samish Bay became the Joe Foss and at the time of the writing of Mr. Skalley's book on the Foss Company she was assigned to Port Angeles harbor. Michael Skalley, The Joe Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 259.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
John L. Sullivan (tugboat)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 4.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Josie Foss (tugboat)
The Josie Foss was the third in a series of J class tugs ordered by Foss for light towing on Puget Sound and Alaska. Built by the Martinolich Shipyard of Tacoma the vessel is 60 feet long with a 21 foot beam. Michael Skalley, The Josie Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 241.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Julia Foss (tugboat)
The Julia Foss named for the wife of Theodore Foss, Thea's sister, was second in the series of new steel tugs built to upgrade Foss' aging Puget Sound fleet and provide new equipment to serve the booming oil industry in Cook Inlet. She left the Albina Shipyard of Portland, Oregon in early May 1964 bound for Foss-Seattle for a week of outfitting. Then on May 12 th, she pulled out for Cook Inlet to tend the drill rigs working day and night locating oil well sites. After this duty she works mostly on Puget Sound. Michael Skalley, The Julia Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 235.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Justine Foss (2) (tugboat)
The second vessel to bear the name Justine Foss was an army tugboat built at Kennydale by the Barbee Marine Yard in 1944. She was acquired by Foss in 1946 and worked primarily on the Coastwise and Alaska and Hawaii areas of Foss operations. She served until the 1970 work season and was then laid up for several years. In October of 1976 she was sold for a conversion into a fishing vessel and was named the Odin. Michael Skalley, The Justine Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 151.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Justine Foss (3) (tugboat)
The third JUSTINE FOSS completed and outfitted at the McDermott Shipbuilding Group in New Iberia, Louisiana, yard in July 1976 was second of the four new automated tugs built for the Ocean Division of the Foss-Dillingham Maritime Group. The first two tugs of the series, BARBARA and JUSTINE, were powered with 4,300-horsepower engines for heavy towing jobs, but the last two of the class, SIDNEY and DREW, were equipped with 3,000-horsepower to handle average tows more economically, using less fuel. Her service is primarily towing in Alaska and along the Coast. Michael Skalley, The Justine Foss (3) , Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 290.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Justine Foss (tugboat)
The Justine Foss was built by Foss Launch and Tug Company at Tacoma in 1930 for service throughout the area served by Foss. She had an Atlas 200 horse power engine and was operated by Foss until December 23, 1941 when she was sunk at Wake Island after the Japanese attack there. (Michael Skalley, Foss, ninety years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 85.).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Katahdin (tugboat)
Built in Seattle in 1899. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 1899. Olympia tugboat race participant in 1984, took top honors in inland class, The Marine Digest. September 29, 1984, p. 11+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Katherine (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Katy (tugboat)
Built in 1868. 75 feet long. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 210. Maritime memories, the Katy, built of solid oak in San Francisco in 1868, The Marine Digest. February 22, 1986, p. 6. Katy converted to diesel when burned in 1953 was probably the oldest tug in the United States, Marine Digest. March 1, 1986, p. 6.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kenai (tugboat)
The Tugboat General Miflan was built in San Francisco in 1904 for duty in and around the coastal defense forts between Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. After service at Fort Worden the U.S. government declared the vessel surplus to their needs and she was purchased by the Cary-Davis Tug and Barge Company who sold her to Alaska Steamship Company who rebuilt her in 1933-34 and gave the name Kenai to the ship. After other changes in ownership she became part of the Foss fleet and served until 1962 when the vessel was cut up for scrap. Michael Skalley, The tug Kenai, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 155.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Kings Point (tugboat)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 34, 124.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lady Pacific (tugboat)
Sudbury II sports new lines as Lady Pacific. The Marine Digest August 15, 1981. p. 4. (Famous old salvage tug refitted for brine freezing by new owner Comeau Seafoods.).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lark (tugboat)
Ruby El Hult, Steamboats in the timber., p. 99.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lela Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Lela Foss (1) was built in 1942 by the Foss Launch and Tug Company in Tacoma in 1942. She was 32 foot long with a beam of 11 feet. She worked mostly in the Tacoma harbor area and was laid up in Ocober of 1953. She was sold in 1959 for Alaska work and was renamed the Molly Hogan. She sank in 1965 in Wrangell Narrows, south of Petersburg, Alaska. (Michael Skalley, The Lela Foss (1) Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. 144.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lela Foss (2) (tugboat)
The second LELA, a steel tug completed in June 1966 by the Pacific Shipyard of Anacortes, Washington was the fifth in a series of nine new harbor tugs programmed for local use in the Puget Sound ports served by Foss. The tug is thirty-seven feet long with a fourteen foot beam. She started out in Tacoma, remained a few months and then went over to Port Angeles in September 1966 to help out the regulars, the FOSS-8 and NANCY FOSS, in juggling log rafts and boomsticks. This kind of service continues as she spends most of her time working out of Bellingham. Michael Skalley, The Lela Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 249.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lela Foss (2) (tugboat)
The second LELA, a steel tug completed in June 1966 by the Pacific Shipyard of Anacortes, Washington was the fifth in a series of nine new harbor tugs programmed for local use in the Puget Sound ports served by Foss. The tug is thirty-seven feet long with a fourteen foot beam. She started out in Tacoma, remained a few months and then went over to Port Angeles in September 1966 to help out the regulars, the FOSS-8 and NANCY FOSS, in juggling log rafts and boomsticks. This kind of service continues as she spends most of her time working out of Bellingham. Michael Skalley, The Lela Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 249.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Leslie Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Leslie Foss began her career as a U.S. Army tug built in 1944 at Minneford Yacht Yard in City Island, New YOrk. She was 117 feet in length with a beam of 28 feet. She was purchased in July 1946 by the Baltimore Towing Company and named the John Michael. After Alaskan service with some difficulties the vessel was purchased at a U.S. Marshal's sale in April of 1951 and renamed the Leslie Foss. She was operated by Foss in Alaska and along the coast until April 19, 1968 and was laid up at Tacoma. She was sold June 6, 1969 to Gig Harbor interests and was renamed first the Enchanter and later the Polar Navigator. After additional difficulties she was sold to California interests and her name was changed to Western Sea I. Michael Skalley, The Leslie Foss (1) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 174.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lorna Foss (2) (tugboat)
The LORNA, built as the PALOMAR, was designed by R. L, Prewett for the Star & Crescent Boat Company, parent Company of the San D@ego Marine Construction Company. Star & Crescent installed a 240-horsepower Fairbanks Morse diesel, giving her an 11-knot speed and with a 6,000 gallon fuel capacity she had a 5,000-mile cruising range. After being acquired by Foss she worked on the Puget Sound runs of the Company and others and on May 7, 1979 was sold to Tacoma interests who renamed her the Palomar. Michael Skalley, Lorna Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 214.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lorna Foss (3) (tugboat)
The last tug to carry the name LORNA was one of several wood YTB-Class tugs built for the U.S Navy in Everett Marine Ways. Everett's sawmills furnished the clear douglas fir for her planking and timbering. The navy assigned the tug number YTB-289, the number supposedly representing the number of like naval auxiliaries at the time, however, she did have a paper name, SAKAWESTON. Foss entered an offer for the vessel when it became surplus and on November 29, 1960 they received word that their bid was accepted and that the 289, with extensive fire-fighting equipment intact, could be removed from the Bremerton Navy yard. The vessel became the Lummi Bay under the ownership of the Bellingham Tug and Barge Company. This was not changed until the winter of 1969-70 when she was given the name Lorna Foss. She operated as the Lorna Foss until June of 1980 when she was sold to Seattle interests and was renamed Blackfish. Michael Skalley, Lorna Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 214.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lorna Foss (tugboat)
The Lorna Foss was originally the tug Pilot built for the Polson Logging Company at Hoquiam in 1903. Foss purchased the vessel in August of 1927 and kept her until August of 1957 when the rudder fell off and the ship of laid up. She was sold October 24, 1958 and continued to be called the Lorna Foss even though the company tried to force a change for several years. the ship was used in the 1970s as a floating repair shop and as a parade and race vessel. Michael Skalley, Foss, one hundred years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 71.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Louise (tugboat)
Built at Seabeck in 1884 Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 210.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Magnolia (tugboat)
The Third Magnolia; in February 4, 1984 issue Roland Carey noted that only two vessels were named Magnolia, there was a third, a tug operated by the Olson Tug Boat Company, The Marine Digest. March 10, 1984. p. 14. Third Magnolia's past remembered, operated by the Olson Tug Boat Company, Marine Digest. September 8, 1984, p. 14. Nick Olson, More details of the tug and the family business, The Marine Digest. October 6, 1984, p. 14.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Foss (1) (tugboat)
The MARGARET FOSS, an ex-Army tug named SGT. JAMES A. BURZO during her military service, was one of a series of Army tug-passenger vessels with the class number TP99. The BURZO was a sister-tug to the PACIFIC, which later became the third EDITH FOSS. The BURZO operated solely on the West Coast during and after World War 11, including a number of years in Southeastern Alaska while based in Kodiak. She was declared surplus in June 1950 and at a Government sale in August at Fort Richardson, Alaska, Foss turned in the high bid of $7,678. She spent most of her career at Foss in Southeastern Alaska and in May of 1962 returned to Puget Sound and in December of that year was placed on the retired list. She was later sold and became the fishing vessel Baron and later the Royal Baron. Michael Skalley, The Margaret Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 171.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Margaret Foss (2) began her career in 1943 having been built at the Levingston Shipyard of Orange Texas as an ocean-class tug numbered ATA 126. After service in the Royal Navy as the tug Mindful she was returned to the United States. Later sold to the Moran Towing Company of New York she was renamed the Gay Moran and after two years was sold to the Redstack Towing Company of San Francisco and became the Sea Lion. Sold later on she became the Margaret Walsh and remained with that name until purchased by Foss where she was given the name Margaret Foss. After a long career with Foss she was laid up in Tacoma and later sold to Mexican Interests and on December 4, 1968 newly renamed as the CC#7 she left Tacoma for Ensenada, Mexico for work with the limestone industry there. Michael Skalley, The Margaret Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 250.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Margaret Foss (2) began her career in 1943 having been built at the Levingston Shipyard of Orange Texas as an ocean-class tug numbered ATA 126. After service in the Royal Navy as the tug Mindful she was returned to the United States. Later sold to the Moran Towing Company of New York she was renamed the Gay Moran and after two years was sold to the Redstack Towing Company of San Francisco and became the Sea Lion. Sold later on she became the Margaret Walsh and remained with that name until purchased by Foss where she was given the name Margaret Foss. After a long career with Foss she was laid up in Tacoma and later sold to Mexican Interests and on December 4, 1968 newly renamed as the CC#7 she left Tacoma for Ensenada, Mexico for work with the limestone industry there. Michael Skalley, The Margaret Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 250.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Margaret Foss (3) (tugboat)
The Margaret Foss was built in 1963 at the Main Iron Works in Houma, Louisiana. The vessel is 100 feet long with a 25 foot beam. Known first as the Dennis W. Guidry at New Orleans she was purchased by Foss in August of 1974 for primary service on Puget Sound. The tug has also been used for work to and from Alaska. Michael Skalley, The Margaret Foss (3) , Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 286.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Marion Moran (tugboat)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 169.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Martha Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Martha Foss was built in 1943 by the Northwestern Shipbuilding Company of Bellingham, Washington. She was 117 feet in length with a 28 foot beam. She was built for the United States Army and was known as the LT-160. She was purchasee from the Army in May of 1946 and named the Sea Horse but soon thereafter the name was changed to the Martha Foss after the first vessel of that name was sunk in a collision with the steamer Iroquois in May of 1946. The Martha worked for Foss along the coast and in Alaska until December 20, 1965. She was later purchased by outside interests and renamed the Makah and operated in South Vietnam where she sank. Michael Skalley, The Martha Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 179.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Ann (tugboat)
Aurora Hunt, The Army of the Pacific., p. 244.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary C (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Foss (2) (tugboat)
The MARY FOSS, another product of the McDermott Shipyard Group shipyards of Amelia, Louisiana was built in 1962 for the American Towing Company of Morgan City, Louisiana. They named her E.K. ROCKWELL and for many years she worked out of Morgan City and the Atchafalaya River in the Bayou country of Louisiana. After 1970 her name was changed to AMERICAN CHIEF, a better identifying name for the Company. In May of 1974 she was sold to Inlet Marine of Anchorage and they renamed her Gemini. Early in 1979 Inlet Marine was forced to liquidate and Foss purchased the tug on March 14, 1979 mostly for use on Puget Sound. Michael Skalley, The Mary Foss (2), Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 299.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Gail (tugboat)
The first diesel towboat built specifically for handling barge cargoes on the upper Columbia above Celilo, the twinscrew semi-tunnel-stern steel Mary Gail of 41 tons, 56.3 x 17.1 x 4.7, with twin 200-horsepower diesels, was completed at Maritime Shipyard, Seattle, for Kirk Thompson of Spokane, organizer of the Tidewater Transportation Co. This historic little vessel which set the pattern for important marine developments on the Columbia River system, was designed by H. C. Hanson, who supervised her construction, and that of a 100,000- gallon fuel oil barge (the first all-welded steel barge on the Pacific Coast) for operation with her. Capt. S. V. Winslow was first master of the Mary Gail upon her inauguration of the Portland-Attalia cargo barge route. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 447.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary Gail (tugboat)
The first diesel towboat built specifically for handling barge cargoes on the upper Columbia above Celilo, the twinscrew semi-tunnel-stern steel Mary Gail of 41 tons, 56.3 x 17.1 x 4.7, with twin 200-horsepower diesels, was completed at Maritime Shipyard, Seattle, for Kirk Thompson of Spokane, organizer of the Tidewater Transportation Co. This historic little vessel which set the pattern for important marine developments on the Columbia River system, was designed by H. C. Hanson, who supervised her construction, and that of a 100,000- gallon fuel oil barge (the first all-welded steel barge on the Pacific Coast) for operation with her. Capt. S. V. Winslow was first master of the Mary Gail upon her inauguration of the Portland-Attalia cargo barge route. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1936, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 447.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mary S (tugboat)
Rebuilt tug Mary S. joins Star Marine fleet at Port Townsend, The Marine Digest. October 26, 1985, p. 26.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Masset (tugboat)
The big New Westminster-built steam tugs Masset (115.1 x 23.5 x 12.5) and Moresby (114.7 x 23.6 x 12.4) of 1918 were purchased by M. R. Cliff Tugboat Co. of Vancouver, both oil-burners of 550-horsepower. This firm also added to its fleet the 88-foot steam tug Queen of 600-horsepower, built at New Westminster in 1914. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1938, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 464.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mastick (tugboat)
Speidel, p. 178-79.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mathilda Foss (tugboat)
Michael Skalley, The Mathilda Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 242-244. The MATHILDA FOSS was completed in October 1965 by the Martinolich Shipyard in Tacoma as the SEA QUEEN, for Pacific Towboat Company in Everett. Pacific built her to replace the veteran tug GEORGE W. in Pacific's log-towing service on Puget Sound. With alternate Captains, Tom Crowley and Jerry Biddle, she worked out of Everett for several years towing logs around Puget Sound for pulp mills, sawmills, and logging companies. The SEA QUEEN was also used by Foss-Seattle on barge tows and ship-assists if log towing turned slack. But such was not the case in 1971 during the longshoremen's strike; then the QUEEN had no slack to pick up, not even in her towline...... The Queen became the Mathilda Foss in October, 1974 and was in use when Mr. Skalley wrote his book on Foss. Michael Skalley, The Mathilda Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 242-244.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mckinley (tugboat)
Built in Tacoma in 1902. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Melia Foss (tugboat)
The MELIA FOSS-named for a daughter of Christine Foss Udall, Arthur Foss' daughter-was completed in Tacoma by the Martinolich Shipyard in early May of 1966, second of her type huilt by Martinolich to replace the aging Puget Sound wood tugs. After completing test runs in Tacoma, she went to work for the Seattle office on the North Vancouver car-barge service. The MELIA continued as the primary vessel on the run until the newly repowered and rebuilt GARY FOSS replaced her in mid-July, 1966. The work of the Melia Foss is focused on Puget Sound.Michael Skalley, The Melia Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 255.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Melia Foss (tugboat)
The MELIA FOSS-named for a daughter of Christine Foss Udall, Arthur Foss' daughter-was completed in Tacoma by the Martinolich Shipyard in early May of 1966, second of her type huilt by Martinolich to replace the aging Puget Sound wood tugs. After completing test runs in Tacoma, she went to work for the Seattle office on the North Vancouver car-barge service. The MELIA continued as the primary vessel on the run until the newly repowered and rebuilt GARY FOSS replaced her in mid-July, 1966. The work of the Melia Foss is focused on Puget Sound.Michael Skalley, The Melia Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 255.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Mountaineer (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Myrtle Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Myrtle Foss (1) began her career as the Kingfisher built by James Chilberg of Seattle in 1909 for the Ainsworth and Dunn Fishing Company. This vessel worked on Puget Sound for many years as a fish packer and in 1928 was sold to the Wagner Towing Company of Seattle which was purchased by Foss in 1937. The name Myrtle Foss was given to the vessel in June of 1940 and she continued operations by Foss until December 8, 1962 when she was laid up in dead storage. She was purchased in 1969 and eventually received a new name, Ruth B. The tug is 57 feet long with a beam of 15 feet powered by an Atlas 200 horse power engine. (Michael Skalley, The Myrtle Foss (1), Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 110.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Myrtle Foss (tugboat)
The second MYRTLE FOSS named for a daughter of Hildur and Chris Foss (a nephew of Andrew), was the second of two additional M-class tugs built from tried and proven plans of the MATHILDA FOSS, former SEA QUEEN. The tug was completed in 1966 by the Martinolich Shipyard of Tacoma. The three M-class tugs, MATHILDA, MELIA, and MYRTLE were equipped with 765-horsepower engines in order to handle heavier tows than their immediate predecessors, the 600-horsepower J boats. The MYRTLE started out towing in mid-1966 at Port Angeles, but she was listed as a Tacoma tug and her home port has never changed. Michael Skalley, The Myrtle Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 256.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Myrtle Foss (tugboat)
The second MYRTLE FOSS named for a daughter of Hildur and Chris Foss (a nephew of Andrew), was the second of two additional M-class tugs built from tried and proven plans of the MATHILDA FOSS, former SEA QUEEN. The tug was completed in 1966 by the Martinolich Shipyard of Tacoma. The three M-class tugs, MATHILDA, MELIA, and MYRTLE were equipped with 765-horsepower engines in order to handle heavier tows than their immediate predecessors, the 600-horsepower J boats. The MYRTLE started out towing in mid-1966 at Port Angeles, but she was listed as a Tacoma tug and her home port has never changed. Michael Skalley, The Myrtle Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 256.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Nancy Foss (tugboat)
The Nancy Foss began her career as the Calcite, a yacht owned by Mr. John McMillin of the Roche Harbor Lime Company. Mr. McMillin had her built in 1907 at Lopez, Washington. She continued to be listed as a yacht until 1915 when the ship was redocumented as a freighter hauler. In 1939 she was sold to the Foss organization. She worked mostly out of Port Angeles harbor and was retired on March 21, 1975. In December of that year the Nancy Foss was sold to Olson Brothers of Tacoma who named her the Nancy Bear. She has seen been sold for other uses. Michael Skalley, The Nancy Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 116.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Narcissus (tugboat)
This was the name of the tugboat used in the motion picture Tugboat Annie. It was actually the Arthur Foss.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Neptune (tugboat)
During the early fall of 1838 the Neptune in charge of Captain Ray Quinn made further history when she towed a 960 -foot Benson log raft containing 5,000,000 feet of timber from Astoria to San Diego in 17 days. Although more than 100 of the giant rafts had been delivered in the past 30 years, this was the first time that one of the coastwise tows had been made by a diesel -powered tug. Gordon Newell,Maritime Events of 1939, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 471.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Omer Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Omer Foss was built in 1943 by the Wilson Boat Company of Wilmington California for use by the U.S.Army as MTL-1218. The tug was to be used for river and light harbor towing being able to work in only four feet of water. PUrchased by Foss in June 1947 and named the Omer Foss the tug worked mostly in Port Angeles Harbor until May 2, 1958. She lay idle for a time and in July 1962 was transferred to the Pacific Towboat Company. She became the Sea Prince and operated until late 1970 when she sank at her moorings and on December 30, 1970 was sold for conversion into a fishboat. Michael Skalley, The tug Omer Foss (1) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Omer Foss (2) (tugboat)
The second OMER FOSS was sixth of the nine modern, steel harbor tugs built for Foss to replace the old low-power wood boats. She was constructed at the Pacific Shipyard at Anacortes in 1966. The OMER joined the fleet in December 1966 and after a month of break-in service in Tacoma, Foss assigned her to Port Angeles, to join the LELA and FOSS-8 in shifting log rafts and assisting log carriers in and out of the Port dock. After work elsewhere her primary service was Tacoma harbor. Michael Skalley, The Omer Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 256.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Omer Foss (2) (tugboat)
The second OMER FOSS was sixth of the nine modern, steel harbor tugs built for Foss to replace the old low-power wood boats. She was constructed at the Pacific Shipyard at Anacortes in 1966. The OMER joined the fleet in December 1966 and after a month of break-in service in Tacoma, Foss assigned her to Port Angeles, to join the LELA and FOSS-8 in shifting log rafts and assisting log carriers in and out of the Port dock. After work elsewhere her primary service was Tacoma harbor. Michael Skalley, The Omer Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 256.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oneonta (tugboat)
Oneonta preparing to take on a tow, Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 171.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oregon (tugboat)
ALF, p. 104. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 212.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oswell Foss (tugboat)
The Oswell Fos was one of the largest and most seaworth of the six tugs built by Foss in their Tacoma Yard. Constructed in 1940 the vessel was 74 feet in length with a beam of 19 feet. During World War II the Oswell Foss became the U.S.S. Metea and spent much time working in the Los Angeles Harbor area. She was returned to Foss in 1947 and spent most of the rest of her career on Puget Sound being lated operated by Foss on August 28, 1974 She was sold on September 2, 1975 and the vessel became known as the Jenny W. Michael Skalley, The Oswell Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 126.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Oysterman (tugboat)
In September, 1961 Foss purchased all the tugboats belonging to the Delta Smyth Towing Company of Olympla, consisting of the linehaul tugs AUDREY and HOONAH, plus the harbor tugs OYSTEPMAN, PARTHIA, and RUFUS. Foss repainted the boats to their own identifying colors, green and white, but they retained the Smyth names. Delta V. Smyth, founder of the Smyth Company, started his tugboat career about 1910 working on the tug OYSTERMAN for the Brenner Oyster Company. Later on he purchased the tug and began a towing business in Olympia that lasted until the sale to Foss. Smyth owned and operated thirty-two tugs during forty years of tugboating, but at the time of the sale, the fleet was composed of only five vessels. The tugs were small and low powered compared to the average Foss tug in the Sixties and Seventies, so they were given only limited use. The OYSTERMAN, another wood boat forty-six-feet long, was built in 191 3 by the Brenner Oyster Company for use tending their oyster beds. After many years with Brenner,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Pacific Master (tugboat)
New towboat, The Tacoma News Tribune. March 29, 1967.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Palomar (tugboat)
Participant in tugboat races, Olympia Harbor Days in 1984, winnter of ocean going class, The Marine Digest. September 29, 1984, p. 11+ (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Parthia (tugboat)
In September, 1961 Foss purchased all the tugboats belonging to the Delta Smyth Towing Company of Olympla, consisting of the linehaul tugs AUDREY and HOONAH, plus the harbor tugs OYSTEPMAN, PARTHIA, and RUFUS. Foss repainted the boats to their own identifying colors, green and white, but they retained the Smyth names. Delta V. Smyth, founder of the Smyth Company, started his tugboat career about 1910 working on the tug OYSTERMAN for the Brenner Oyster Company. Later on he purchased the tug and began a towing business in Olympia that lasted until the sale to Foss. Smyth owned and operated thirty-two tugs during forty years of tugboating, but at the time of the sale, the fleet was composed of only five vessels. The tugs were small and low powered compared to the average Foss tug in the Sixties and Seventies, so they were given only limited use. The PARTHIA, oldest of the Smyth boats was built at Winslow, Washington in 1906. She started out with a fifty horsepower gasoline en 'ne, then advanced to a seventy-five
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Patricia Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Grays Habor Shipbuilding Company of Hoquiam, Washington, built a number of tugboats for U.S. Army service during World War II. One of these, the LT-366 known as Private Romeo LeClair, was purchased by Foss in March of 1958 and after refurbishing was named the Patricia Foss (2). The Patricia worked along the Northwest Coast and in Alaska for the Foss Company and after many years of service was placed in stand-by until August 1976 when she was placed in lay-up. She was sold in 1980 and was given the name Dominion. Michael Skalley, The Patricia Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 201.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peggy Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Peggy Foss was built as a Landing Craft, Medium for the United States Navy by the Warren City Tank and Boiler Company of Warren, Ohio, in 1944. She was 53 feet in length with a 14 foot beam. When purchased by Foss in 1950 she was refitted for work in southwestern Alaska. The Peggy worked in Alaska until November 24, 1961 when she was sunk off Anchor Point while under tow of the Agnes Foss. Michael Skalley, The Peggy Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 171.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peggy Foss (3) (tugboat)
The third PEGGY FOSS was completed in September 1969 the ninth and last of the new replacement tugs, updating the Foss day-boat harbor fleet. She was built by the Pacific Shipyard at Anacortes, Washington and was 42 feet in length with a 14 foot beam. The PEGGY and also her sister-tug, SAMISH BAY, were fitted with a Kortnozzle propulsion system which increased the rated horsepower from 360 to 460 and improved the rudder response, so essential for quick maneuvering. The Peggy Foss was given the regular assignment of Puget Sound and Port Angeles. Michael Skalley, The Peggy Foss (3) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 267.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peggy Foss (3) (tugboat)
The third PEGGY FOSS was completed in September 1969 the ninth and last of the new replacement tugs, updating the Foss day-boat harbor fleet. She was built by the Pacific Shipyard at Anacortes, Washington and was 42 feet in length with a 14 foot beam. The PEGGY and also her sister-tug, SAMISH BAY, were fitted with a Kortnozzle propulsion system which increased the rated horsepower from 360 to 460 and improved the rudder response, so essential for quick maneuvering. The Peggy Foss was given the regular assignment of Puget Sound and Port Angeles. Michael Skalley, The Peggy Foss (3) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 267.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peggy Foss (tugboat)
The Peggy Foss was built in 1912 in Seattle and was purchased by Foss on March 28, 1923. She was 32 feet in length with an eight foot beam. Her primary service for Foss was on Lake Union and Lake Washington. She served in the Foss fleet until sold to the U.S. Plywood Corporation in Oregon and was junked by that company in 1969. Michael Skalley, Foss, Ninety Years of Towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 55.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peggy N (tugboat)
Sixty four feet of workshorse for sale, The Marine Digest. February 16, 1985, p. 24. (ad). (il).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peter Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Peter Foss (1) was the fourth tug in a series of five similar tugs built by Foss at Tacoma in 1930. She had an enterprise 600 horse power engine and after War service returned to Tacoma where she was considered the chief harbor tug on the waterfront. She was retired in 1973 and sold on April 1, 1974 to Alaska interests becoming the LUTAK PRIDE. (Michael Skalley, Foss, ninety years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 87).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Peter Foss (3) (tugboat)
The third tug to bear the name Peter Foss left the Main Iron Works shipyard at Houma, Louisiana in late January 1978 complete and ready for acceptance trials on the Mississippi River. After satisfactory test runs, she became part of the Foss fleet in early, February 1978. The Peter (3) was the fifty and last of her class of island and coastwise tugs built for Foss-Dillingham. She was 98 feet in length with a beam of 32 feat. Her primary service was to be at Long Beach, California. Michael Skalley, The Peter Foss (3), Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 298.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Phillips Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Phillips Foss originally a cannery tender-freight vessel, powered with a 150-horsepower Union gas engene, was built under the direction of W. F. Stone for the Red Salmon Canning Company of San Francisco, with canneries located on the Ugashik River, Bristol Bay, Alaska. The boat carried the name FRANK B, in honor of Company President-Manager, Frank B. Peterson. The FRANK B hauled fish in her hold and towed loaded fish scows to the canneries during the canning season. Then in the winter she idled at dockside either by a Company cannery or her home base in San Francisco. The vessel was purchaed in 1942 by the Puget Sound Tug and Barge Company and was renamed Lively. In August 1946 the ship became part of the Foss fleet after damage in February 1967 the vessel was retired and in August, 1968 towed to Port Orchard to serve as a floating breakwater where she later sank in place. Michael Skalley, The tug Phillips Foss (1), Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 155-156.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Phillips Foss (2) (tugboat)
The PHILLIPS FOSS built to replace Foss' aging World War 11 Miki's, was the first of three similar ocean-class tugs the McDermott Shipyard Group of Amelia, Louisiana delivered to Foss in a twelve-month period. With outfitting complete in July 1969 the PHILLIPS, with Captain Arnold Reynolds, left Amelia light for Panama to relieve the ARTHUR FOSS of two barges and deliver them to New Orleans. The PHILLIPS' initial towing was unusual for a Seattle tug by making her break-in trips running back and forth in the Gulf. The tug is 112 feet long with a 31 foot beam and is used all along the Pacific Coast of the United States and Canada. Michael Skalley, The Phillips Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 268.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Phillips Foss (2) (tugboat)
The PHILLIPS FOSS built to replace Foss' aging World War 11 Miki's, was the first of three similar ocean-class tugs the McDermott Shipyard Group of Amelia, Louisiana delivered to Foss in a twelve-month period. With outfitting complete in July 1969 the PHILLIPS, with Captain Arnold Reynolds, left Amelia light for Panama to relieve the ARTHUR FOSS of two barges and deliver them to New Orleans. The PHILLIPS' initial towing was unusual for a Seattle tug by making her break-in trips running back and forth in the Gulf. The tug is 112 feet long with a 31 foot beam and is used all along the Pacific Coast of the United States and Canada. Michael Skalley, The Phillips Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 268.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Pioneer (tugboat)
Built in Philadelphia in 1878. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 213.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Plumas (tugboat)
Fremont Tugboat Company of Seattle purchases tug Plumas, renames the vessel, the Sovereign. Built at Sacramento, California in 1942. The Marine Digest. December 29, 1984, p. 11+
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prosper (tugboat)
The Prosper was built at Port Townsend, Washington in 1898 for the Hastings Steamboat Company. She was purchased by the Pguet Sound Navigation Company in 1902 and after several changes in ownership and World War II service she was acquired by Foss in the summer of 1956. By 1966 the vessel was considered unseaworthy and was laid-up. She was sold by Foss on September 26, 1968 and renamed Odin. Later sold she was renamed Prosper and in 1978 was berthed in Lake Union, Seattle, where she serves as a live aboard. Michael Skalley, The Prosper, Foss, ninety years of towboating, Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 186.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Richard Foss (tugboat)
The RICHARD FOSS, named for Peter and Margaret Campbell's son, a grandson of Sidney and Barbara Foss Campbell, was the first ocean-class tug built from the keel up for the Foss Company. She was completed in 1967 by the McDermott Shipyard Group of Amelia Louisiana. The vessel is 110 feet in length with a thirty foot beam. Several other ocean-class Foss tugs were considered new, but they were rebuilt from ex-World War 11 vessels. At the time, this was the most expeditious method for increasing the fleet to serve Foss' expanding ocean and coastwise towing commitments. The primary service area of the Richard Foss is Puget Sound. Michael Skalley, The Richard Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 260.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Richard Foss (tugboat)
The RICHARD FOSS, named for Peter and Margaret Campbell's son, a grandson of Sidney and Barbara Foss Campbell, was the first ocean-class tug built from the keel up for the Foss Company. She was completed in 1967 by the McDermott Shipyard Group of Amelia Louisiana. The vessel is 110 feet in length with a thirty foot beam. Several other ocean-class Foss tugs were considered new, but they were rebuilt from ex-World War 11 vessels. At the time, this was the most expeditious method for increasing the fleet to serve Foss' expanding ocean and coastwise towing commitments. The primary service area of the Richard Foss is Puget Sound. Michael Skalley, The Richard Foss Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 260.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Roland Foss (2) (tugboat)
The ROLAND, first of three identical Navy tugs, was built by Puget Sound Bridge & Dredge Company during World War 11. The tugs were identified by Navy numbers, the ROLAND YTB-361 and the sister-tugs YTB-3 62 and YTB-363. The YTBs were used in Alaska and Puget Sound as general service tugs. The 361 served the Navy for seventeen years, then in 1960 she was declared surplus and sold by sealed bid on October 28, 1960 to the Foss Company. On November 25, the ELAINE towed her to the Foss-Seattle yard for outfitting. After three months of yard work the tug was ready to take on a job, under the name ROLAND FOSS. Not since 1946 had the name ROLAND been carried on the roster of active tugs. The Roland Foss (2) worked around Puget Sound until May 4, 1974 when she ended her active career for Foss. She was sold in December 1976 and became known as the Chippewa for Alaska service. (Michael Skalley, The Roland Foss, (2), Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 218.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Roland Foss (tugboat)
The Roland Foss, first known as the Rival, was built in Seattle in 1910. She was eventually acquired by the Rouse Towing Company and joined the Foss organization in 1919. The U.S. Navy purchased the Roland Foss in March of 1944 for service around Portland and she became a fish boat after World War II. She sank at her berth at Skamokawa on the Columbia River in 1965. (Michael Skalley, Foss, Ninety Years of Towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 82.)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Roosevelt (tugboat)
The Tug Roosevelt in the Bristol Bay Ice Pack, ALF, p. 108. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea p. 213.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rufus (tugboat)
In September, 1961 Foss purchased all the tugboats belonging to the Delta Smyth Towing Company of Olympla, consisting of the linehaul tugs AUDREY and HOONAH, plus the harbor tugs OYSTEPMAN, PARTHIA, and RUFUS. Foss repainted the boats to their own identifying colors, green and white, but they retained the Smyth names. Delta V. Smyth, founder of the Smyth Company, started his tugboat career about 1910 working on the tug OYSTERMAN for the Brenner Oyster Company. Later on he purchased the tug and began a towing business in Olympia that lasted until the sale to Foss. Smyth owned and operated thirty-two tugs during forty years of tugboating, but at the time of the sale, the fleet was composed of only five vessels. The tugs were small and lowpowered compared to the average Foss tug in the Sixties and Seventies, so they were given only limited use. The largest tug in Smyth's fleet, the HOONAH, sixty-six feet in length was built in Bellingham in 1919, a wood hull cannery tender, for Pan American Fisheries. She remain
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Rustler (tugboat)
Built in 1887 at Grays Harbor. Oldest towboat in Puget Sound, Peninsula Gateway. October 3, 1984, p. 4 - C.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sam Foss (tugboat)
Pacific Shipyard built the SAM, another addition to the modernization and replacement program of the Foss Puget Sound fleet. SAM was the third boat to come out in the series of nine new steel harbor tugs, and to give the boat a wider range of use, a special fire pump and monitor were installed. The fire pump, operating from a power take-off on the main engine, has a ten-inch sea suction and an eight-inch discharge line capable of delivering three thousand gallons per minute. The monitor has a five-inch nozzle and produces enough force to drive the tug rapidly of the stream 's shot over the bow into the water. The setup made the SAM into a fireboat-tug, handy for astern I washing down scows and barges as well as fire-fighting and towing. The vessel is used in Tacoma harbor. Michael Skalley, The Sam Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 236.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sandra Foss (1) (tugboat)
The Allman-Hubble Tugboat Company of Grays Harbor had the tugboat Tyee built by the Chilman Shipyards of Hoquiam in 1925. She was 77 feet in length with a 21 foot beam. After a series of disasters the vesell was acquired by Foss and after a major refit began operations in June of 1942 as the Sandra Foss. She operated on Puget sound until March 1, 1973 when she was laid up and was purchased by Alaska interests in 1974 and renamed the Tyee for work mostly around Wrangell, Juneau, Haines and Skagway. Michael Skalley, The Sandra Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 128-133.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sandra Foss (2) (tugboat)
The Sandra Foss was built in 1976 at the Fairhaven Shipyard in Bellingham, washington but was delivered to Foss at their Seattle Shipyard for completion. The vessel is 110 feet long with a beam of 34 feet originally powered by EMD (Twin) 2,900 horse power engines.Her service is on Puget Sound mostly in connection with the tanker business. Michael Skalley, The Sandra Foss (2) , Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 292.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sea Breeze (tugboat)
Participant in the tugboat races at Olympia Harbor days, The Marine Digest. September 29, 1984, p. 11+.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sea Duke (tugboat)
Photo of vessel on fire in Everett in 1964, The Marine Digest. August 15, 1981, p. 16. (An early name of this vessel was Victor II).
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sea King (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 214.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Shelley Foss (tugboat)
The SHELLEY FOSS, launched in Portland June 17, 1970 by the Albina Shipyard was designed and planned to take over ship assists in Seattle Harbor. The work had been ably carried out for the past twelve years by the CAROL and SHANNON FOSS, but ship tonnage and the number of the ships arriving and departing had increased to a point where a larger and more powerful tug was needed, hence the SHELLEY. She continues to serve in Seattle harbor and often serves as the tug called upon to take special guests on waterfront tours. Michael Skalley, The Shelley Foss, Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 277.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Shelley Foss (tugboat)
The SHELLEY FOSS, launched in Portland June 17, 1970 by the Albina Shipyard was designed and planned to take over ship assists in Seattle Harbor. The work had been ably carried out for the past twelve years by the CAROL and SHANNON FOSS, but ship tonnage and the number of the ships arriving and departing had increased to a point where a larger and more powerful tug was needed, hence the SHELLEY. She continues to serve in Seattle harbor and often serves as the tug called upon to take special guests on waterfront tours. Michael Skalley, The Shelley Foss, Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 277.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sidney Foss (tugboat)
The SIDNEY FOSS, named for S. D. Campbell, Board Chairman of Foss Launch & Tug Company, was completed and accepted for service from McDermott in November 1976. The SIDNEY, assigned to the Foss Ocean Division, was the third of the four new tugs built by McDermott for the Dillingham Maritime group, All tugs in the series were given full engine-room monitoring and automation. They were complete and modern in all respects. The SIDNEY is considered the ideal type tug, economical yet able to handle general ocean and coastwise towing. Michael Skalley, The Sidney Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 293.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Simon Foss (tugboat)
The Simon Foss was built as the Alice at the Crawford and Haskell Yard in Tacoma Washington for Captian William Bradford of Tacoma. She was 65 feet in length with a 16 foot beam. After several changes in ownership she was purchased by Foss in February 1941 and given the name Simon Foss. In 1963 she was sold to Gordon Newell of Olympia to use as a beach house and office and was shoved up on the beach below Newell's home by the Drew Foss. Newell renamed her the Alice. l Skalley, The Simon Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981, p. 136.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Sound (tugboat)
Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 214.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
St. Clair (tugboat)
Canadian tugboat, out of Vancouver, B. C., ran aground off Port San Juan, B. C., and became a total loss, January 22, 1949. Two crew members were drowned. J.A. Gibbs, Shipwrecks off Juan De Fuca Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Stacey Foss (tugboat)
Fairhaven Shipyard of Bellingham, Washington, completed the Stacey in all parts a contrast with her sister tug the Sandra only partially finished and the Fairhaven yard. The Stacey was to be based in Bellingham as an escort and assist tug for tankers delivering oil to northern Puget Sound refineries and in charge of the senior skipper of the Foss Bellingham Division, Captain Dick Blake, a veteran of forty years. The tugboat is 112 feet long with a 34 foot beam. Her original propulsion unit was a EMD (Twin), 2,900 horse power engine. Michael Skalley, The Stacey Foss , Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 291.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tacoma (tugboat)
Built in San Francisco in 1877. Gordon Newell, Ships of the Inland Sea, p. 215. Michael Jay Mjelde, The Steam Tug Tacoma, The Sea Chest. XVII (March, 1984), p. 112-124. Murray C. Morgan. Last Wilderness, p. 72. NMH, p. 135, 144, 239, 376.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tugboat
The Foss Company named their eighth D-class tug DUNCAN after a son of Sidney and Barbara Foss Campbell. The DUNCAN was the last of the D boats built by the Albina Shipyard of Portland, Oregon for Foss. She came up from Portland in May 1970 and in less than a week after arrival at the Foss pier, the DUNCAN began her Alaska service by towing a container-barge to Cook Inlet. From there she went on shuttle runs between Southwestern Alaska ports during the fishing and canning season-hauling container cargo for Sea-Land Services, Inc. Michael Skalley, The Duncan Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 272.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tugboat
The Foss Company named their eighth D-class tug DUNCAN after a son of Sidney and Barbara Foss Campbell. The DUNCAN was the last of the D boats built by the Albina Shipyard of Portland, Oregon for Foss. She came up from Portland in May 1970 and in less than a week after arrival at the Foss pier, the DUNCAN began her Alaska service by towing a container-barge to Cook Inlet. From there she went on shuttle runs between Southwestern Alaska ports during the fishing and canning season-hauling container cargo for Sea-Land Services, Inc. Michael Skalley, The Duncan Foss (2) Foss Ninety Years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 272.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tugboat Tex (tug)
A former U. S. Navy subchaser, Tugboat Tex, operated by a British Columbia owner, sank in 600 feet of water in Howe Sound, her owner claiming fire had forced him to abandon ship. Capt. Clarke, representing her underwriters, flew over the scene in a plane and spotted the wreck, which was raised by the salvage barge Skookum. It was found that she had been deliberately sunk and warrant for barratry was issued, but her former owner disappeared and was never served. The wreck lay on the beach for a year, after which Pacific Salvage Co. removed the engine in settlement of salvage costs. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1925, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 368.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tyee (tugboat)
Tacoman among four in tugboat rescue The Tacoma Times. December 7, 1940.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Tyee (tugboat)
The Tyee, the finest and most powerful tugboat on Puget Sound, was launched at Port Ludlow in 1884 for the Puget Mill Company and is one hundred and forty-one feet two inches long, twenty-six feet beam, and twelve feet hold, with engines of seven hundred horse-power. Capt. William Gove was given command and has remained in charge continuously since her first trip, while J. A. Snyder,Harry Harkins, J. R.Ludlow, W. A. Cox, and other well known engineers, have served on the tug. E.W. Wright, Maritime business of 1884, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895].. p. 322.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wallace Foss (tugboat)
The Wallace Foss began her career in 1897 having been built in Old Tacoma for the Blekum Towboat Company of Seattle who named her the Oscar B. After a rebuilding she was known as the Rouse for her wners and was added to the Foss Fleet when the Rouse interests were purchased. After many years of service to the Foss interests she was sold and was converted to become the yacht Laura E. (Michael Skalley. Foss, one hundred years of towboating, Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1981, p. 81.)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wedell Foss (tugboat)
Maritime memories, the Neptune, operation by the Puget Sound Tug and Barge Company until taken over by the U.S. Army during World War II went to Foss Tug in a court settlement and was renamed the Wedell Foss. Later sold but was working in San Francisco in 1895, The Marine Digest. July 12, 1986, p. 5.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wedell Foss (tugboat)
The Wedell Foss began her career as the R.M. Woodward owned bgy the U.S. Public Health Service built in Baltimore in 1904. She was 109 feet in length with a 23 foot beam. She was deactivated by the government in the 1930s and sold to the Puget Sound Tug and Barge Company in May of 1937. Renamed the Neptune she joined the Army Transport Service during World War II and in August of 1946 was acquired by Foss. She ran in Puget Sound and Southeastern Alaska and was retired sold to California interests.Michael Skalley, The tug Wendell Foss, Foss, ninety years of towboating. Seattle: Superior, 1981. p. 159.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Wendy Foss (tugboat)
WENDY FOSS, ex-PACIFIC MARINER, while under construction for the Olsen Lumber Company was acquired direct from the shipyard by Pacific Tow & Salvage Company. The vessel was built in 1964 by the San Diego Marine Construction Company of San Diego. The vessel is 110 feet long and has a 27 foot depth. During her time with PT&S the MARINER engaged in a variety of towing assignments. On her first run In 1964 she towed loaded lumber barges between Oregon and northern California mills to southern California ports, and surprisingly, for Olsen Lumber Company. Then in November 1964 the MARINER ran light to Oakland and relieved the DONNA FOSS of the Sea-Land container barge COLUMBIA. For the next four months, she continued on the container haul from Portland to Oakland. The vessel was chosen to do work in Viet Nam and returned to the Pacific Northwest in 1968. Her service continues in Ocean and Coastwise towing as the Wendy Foss. Michael Skalley, The Wendy Foss, Foss, ninety years of Towboating. Seattle: Superior Publi
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Western Star (tugboat)
This American diesel tugboat, 28 tons, burned at Seiku, Washington, February 4, 1959. Built in 1920, the vessel was owned by R. A. Busacker of Tacoma. J.A. Gibbs, Shipwrecks of Juan De Fuca. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Willamette Pilot Iii (tugboat)
Tug completes a 25,140 mile voyage around the world; believed to be a first for a West Coast boat. Marine Digest, September 17, 1983, p. 11+. (il)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Winamac (tugboat)
Fifty three foot length, built in Vancouver, BC. 1909. Participant in Olympia Harbor Days tugboat races. Currently based at Gig Harbor. Marine Digest, Deptember 29, 1984, p. 11+. (cover photo) 1909 Winamac to participate in Good Old Days, Peninsula Gateway, October. 3, 1984, 4-C. (il)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library