George H. Williams (fireboat)
The steam fireboat George H. Williams, 194 tons, 105.5 feet long, with 175 -horsepower compound engine, was completed by the Wfllamette Iron & Steel Co. and placed in service by the Portland Fire Department. Gordon Newell, Martime Events of 1904, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 106.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Joseph B. Williams (towboat)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 580.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Lizzie Williams (bark)
The American bark Lizzie Williams, Captain Cushman, was wrecked at Tugidak Island, sixty-five miles from Karluk, Alaska, April 22d. She was owned by the Karluk Packing Company and had a cannery outfit and seventy-five Chinamen aboard. The latter reached shore in safety, and a portion of the cargo was recovered. E. W. Wright, Finest Steamers in the Northwest Appear on Puget Sound Waters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and events referred to in this chapter generally took place in 1889., p.373.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Prince William Henry (schooner)
Built at Nootka, Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971., I, p. 81. C.F. Newcombe. Menzies' Journal of Vancouver's voyage, 1792., p. 124, 129, 131.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
The Aged William H. Smith, Rerigged As A Five
masted schooner, - made a voyage or two under tow following an offshore trip to Guaymas, but went into final layup during the year. Nelson's coastwise fleet of smaller schooners and barkentines, including Thos. P Emigh, Aurora, James Johnson, Mary Winkelman, Minnie A. Caine and Taurua remained active, often towed by steam schooners along the coast and sometimes making voyages under sail to Hawaii or Mexico. Turbo-electric passenger steamship Cuba J. B. STETSON Steam schooner. The steam schooner J. B. Stetson was sold by the Pacific Mercantile Marine Co. to the A. B. Johnson Lumber Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1923, H.M. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 343.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William & Ann
March 11, 1829 Supply vessel for Hudson Bay Fur Co. Under Captain Swan, she ran ashore on Clatsop Spit. None of her passengers or crew survived, supposedly murdered by the Indians (see story, William & Ann). Records suggest this was not true, for Dr. John MeLoughlin sent a schooner from Vancouver to recover the various bits of flotsam salvaged by the Indians, but never did he demand the tribe to produce the murderers. This controversial action, long denounced in history, was further complicated by the rash act of shelling the Indian village and killing the chief and two others, all for the recovery of a lifeboat and some oars. Most certainly McLaughlin did not order that done; nor did the Indians kill any of the William & Ann's survivors. Don Marshall, Ship Disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment. Portland: Binfords, 1984, p. 133-134
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William (brig)
This British brig was driven ashore about four miles east of Pachena Point, January 1, 1854. The captain and the cook perished. Fourteen survivors reached shore and were cared for by the natives, who later took them to Sooke by canoe. J.A. Gibbs, Shipwrecks of Juan De Fuca. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William (tug)
William, 63 -foot diesel tug, (named for W. H. Williams, the firm's secretary-treasurer) purchased from Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co. by W. H. Powell and H. C. Hill, who organized the Northwest Towboat Co. as her operating firm; Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966.. p. 575.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William A. Cooper
The WILLIAM A. COOPER was a 3-masted, square-rigged sailing ship, built in 1847, in Pittston, Maine; 645 tons, 147 x 30.9 x 15.5 feet (length x beam x depth of hold) [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-55]), vol 5, p. 3322]. I know nothing of her history before or after this voyage. It may, however, have been short, as her master in 1848, William A. Cutts, was by 1850 master of the ship CHARLES COOPER, also built in Pittston (in 1849), and if not properly a sister ship to the WILLIAM A. COOPER, almost certainly belonging to the same owner(s): the two vessels were almost identical in size, and it is therefore unlikely that taking command of the CHARLES COOPER would have been considered a "step up" for Cutts [Carl C. Cutler, Queens of the Western Ocean; The Story of America's Mail and Passenger Sailing Lines (Annapolis: United States Naval Institute, c1961), p. 520].
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer]
William A. Grozier (schooner)
117 tons. Built in 1873 in Kennebunkport, Albert C. Church. Whale Ships and Whaling, 1938., p. 166.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Allen
Clinton Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State . History of Washington., iii, p. 129.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William And Ann (brig)
British vessel, 300 tons, wrecked on Clatsop Spit, March 10, 1829, Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 22, 188. Mr. Gibbs called it a Bark. Cedar brig., 161 tons, built in Bermuda in 1818. Purchased by HBC in 1824. Made first northern trading voyage in 1825. Wrecked on the Columbia River Bar, March 10, 1829. Norman R. Hacking and W. Kaye Lamb. The Princess Story, p. 335. Wrecked. North Pacific History Company. History of the Pacific Northwest I, p. 116. Wrecked on Clatsop Spit, 1829. Murray C. Morgan. The Columbia p. 268. Herbert H. Bancroft, History of Oregon. I, p. 40, 41. First to carry goods to Fort Vancouver. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971. I, p. 247. Wrecked, 1829. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971. I, p. 364, 365. Owyhee log. Charles H. Carey. General History of Oregon. 1971. I, p. 416. BLJM, p. 6, 12, 18-22, 29, 31, 34, 36, 38-42, 106, 119. Hudson Bay ship. MWNE, p. 147, 148. Assigned to caostal reconnaissance in 1825. Captain Henry Hanwell. Lost in 1829 on Columbia River
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Baylies (bark)
John Herman, known as Bismarck, a seaman aboard the whaling steam bark William Baylies who had left the ship and wintered at St. Lawrence Island, was blamed by the local medicine men for the heavy disease toll on the island and was sacrificed by them and later cremated, according to Charles A. Boyle, second mate of the Baylies, who made an investigation following Herman's failure to rejoin the ship on her return from San Francisco for the 1902 season. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1902, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 86.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Baylies (bark)
The steam whaling bark William Baylies was wrecked in the ice May 15 at 63 degrees 30 minute N, 179 degrees 51 minutes W. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1907, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 137.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Bowden
The William Bowden built by Hall Bros. in 1892 as a 778 - ton four - masted schooner, in layup from 1922 until her conversion to a barge in 1925, wrecked February 12, 1926 at Redondo Beach, California. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1926, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 376.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Bowden (schooner)
The William Bowden, a four - masted schooner of 778 tons and 900 M capacity, was built at Port Blakely by Hall Bros., in 1892 for their own management. Her last years of trading were full of hard luck. ln January, 1919, she put into San Francisco, leaking, bound from Port Blakely to Sydney, and repairs took two months. In February, 1920, on another voyage to Sydney, she encountered a hurricane which loosened the deck load and started her leaking again; both the donkey engine and gas pump broke down and she ran short of water; she was eventually picked up off Wreck Bay with a 30 degree list and 6 feet of water in the hold, arriving at Sydney March 6th, 91 days out of Astoria. On the return passage from Fiji to Puget Sound, she got ashore at the Quillayute River, south of Flattery, 32 days out; but was pulled off the next day. She was laid up at San Francisco after arrival from Tonga in April, 1922; in 1925 was sold to Los Angeles owners as a fishing barge; and was wrecked at Redondo Beach February 12, 1926. Jo
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Bowden (schooner)
The William Bowden, a four - masted schooner of 778 tons and 900 M capacity, was built at Port Blakely by Hall Bros., in 1892 for their own management. Her last years of trading were full of hard luck. ln January, 1919, she put into San Francisco, leaking, bound from Port Blakely to Sydney, and repairs took two months. In Feb- ruary, 1920, on another voyage to Sydney, she encountered a hur- ricane which loosened the deck load and started her leaking again; both the donkey engine and gas pump broke down and she ran short of water; she was eventually picked up off Wreck Bay with a 30 degree list and 6 feet of water in the hold, arriving at Sydney March 6th, 91 days out of Astoria. On the return passage from Fiji to Puget Sound, she got ashore at the Quillayute River, south of Flattery, 32 days out; but was pulled off the next day. She was laid up at San Francisco after arrival from Tonga in April, 1922; in 1925 was sold to Los Angeles owners as a fishing barge; and was wrecked at Redondo Beach February 12, 1926
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Bowden (schooner)
The schooner William Bowden arrived at Astoria January 3, 3;/2 days from San Francisco. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 164.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Carson (barkentine)
William Carson, four-masted barkentine of 890 tons, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., in 1899, doubtless by, Bendixsen for Dolbeer & Carson; but she had a very short career, being listed in Lloyd's Register, 1900, as beached after collision, December, 1899. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Sept. 20, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Carson (barkentine)
William Carson, four-masted barkentine of 890 tons, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., in 1899, doubtless by, Bendixsen for Dolbeer & Carson; but she had a very short career, being listed in Lloyd's Register, 1900, as beached after collision, December, 1899. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. Sept. 20, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Chatham (steam Schooner)
New steel steam schooners of greater capacity and power than the wooden lumber carriers continued to appear in increasing numbers on the Pacific Coast. The William Chatham, Capt. C. J. Lancaster, made her maiden voyage in February for a lumber cargo at Raymond. Built by the Union Iron Works at San Francisco, the Loop Lumber Co. acted as her managing owners, with a large share held by the Tacoma Mill Co. The 235-foot vessel maintained a speed of I 1. 92 knots on her 200-mile trial run in January. Although capable of carrying 1,500,000 feet of lumber, her maximum draft was only 19 feet, making it possible for her to trade to many of the smaller lumber ports along the coast which were normally not visited by vessels of her size. The Chatham was a two-masted steamer with engines and house aft. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 221.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Crawford (tug)
The tug William Crawford, 47 feet with twin screws and two 35-horsepower Atlas gas engines, Seattle, for Merrill & Ring Lumber Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1916, H. S. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William D, Sewall
"William D. Sewall" was a full-rigged ship of 672 tons, 141 feet long x 32 feet 5 inches broad and 16 feet 2 1/4 inches in depth, built in Bath, Maine, in 1848, by Clarke, Sewall & Co [William Armstrong Fairburn, Merchant Sail (Center Lovell, ME: Fairburn Marine Educational Foundation, [1945-1955]), V.3195, 3196, and 3261]. She was apparently a transient trader, following neither a set route nor a set schedule. The only other reference I have to her is the arrival at New York on 4 May 1852 of the ship William D. Sewall, of Bath, Robert Jack, master, from Liverpool 28 March, with 253 passengers (2 deaths) [National Archives Microfilm Publication M237, roll 112, list #468; printed in Ira A. Glazier and P. William Filby, Germans to America, (Wilmington, DE: Scholarly Resources, 1988ff), vol. 3, pp. 332-334]..
Citation: [Posted to the Emigration-Ships Mailing List by Michael Palmer - 11 June 1997]
William Denny (barge)
The William Denny, one of the world's largest offshore construction barges, was also built jointly by Burrard and Yarrows for the recently formed offshore construction division of Raymond International, Inc., a major international construction firm. With dimensions of 350 x 100 feet, this giant specialized barge was fitted with a 500-ton diesel-powered revolving crane with a 250-foot boom. Construction costs totaled $4.5 million. The barge was fabricated at the Burrard yard in three sections, which were towed to Yarrows for assembly in the large graving dock, after which the completed hull was towed back to Burrard for final outfitting. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1969, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975, p.63.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Dollar
Alongside James Dollar in Lake Union. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 102. In Lake Union, Seattle. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 136.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Dollar (square Rigger)
The advent of the worldwide economic depression was a new blow to the remaining ships of sail, a number of which had been in layup in Pacific Coast ports, their owners hoping for a repetition of the 1927-1928 shipping boom wmch might put them to work again. The depression put an end to such hopes and to the careers of many of the old windjammers. Three of the largest square-riggers ever built, the steel fourmasted barks William Dollar and James Dollar, moored on Lake Union, and the Mae Dollar, in layup at San Francisco, were sold to Capt. B. L. Johnson for the Pacific (Coyle) Navigation Co. of Vancouver and were reduced to barges. All three vessels were of over 3,000 tons and about 320 feet in length. James Dollar was built at Glasgow in 1901 as the Standard Oil Co. case oil carrier Comet; Mae Dollar at Glasgow in 1892 as Somali, and William Dollar at Dumbarton in 1902 as Alsterberg. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-1930, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior, 1966.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William E. Mussman (tanker)
783'; 144' beam, built in Japan 1979. Extra-wide tanker lands in Seattle, Marine Digest, May 11, p. 18. (photo)
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William E. Reis
Built at Seattle in 1907. Became the Urania.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William F. Bowne (schooner)
The William F. Bowne, a schooner, probably two-masted, of 136 tons, was built by John Kruse on the Umpqua, Ore., in 1864, costing $16,000, and dropped from registry about 1880. uuu
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William F. Bowne (schooner)
The William F. Bowne, a schooner, probably two-masted, of 136 tons, was built by John Kruse on the Umpqua, Ore., in 1864, costing $16,000, and dropped from registry about 1880. uuu
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William F. Bryant (schooner)
When the Delta was no longer able to provide service on Hood Canal it was replaced by the William F. Bryant which was built in Hoquiam in 1896. It was a three masted schooner of 135 tons and was 98.8 feet long. Captain Troutman renamed it for his wife, Dora, and it became the Dode. This ship was converted to steam and outfitted for carrying passengers and freight. Captain Troutman went to a Seattle bank to arrange for a loan to pay the shipyard for their conversion work. The captain obtained the loan, but after leaving the bank with the money, was never seen or heard of again. Mrs. Troutman attempted to carry on the service but ran into difficulties. The creditors closed her out and took possession of the vessel. Judge Allen of Seattle had furnished the bond for the mail contract, and when the Dode was removed from service, it worked a hardship on the judge. He contacted his son-in-law William McKenzie of Anacortes who owned a fleet of smail tugs. From him he leased the steamer Albion until the mail contract
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William F. Canns (schooner)
This American four-masted schooner, 1,094 tons, badly buffeted off Vancouver Island's west coast, December 28, 1913, after losing her rudder. Laden with a full cargo of mine timbers for Mexico, she drifted within 600 yards of shore vath all anchors out. An effort to launch a boat to go for help failed. When all hope appeared lost, the cutter Snohomish and tug Goliah caine to the rescue and pulled the battered, dismasted vessel to safety. Her deckload was gone, as well as most of her masts and rigging. She was in command of Captain F. Turloff. The vessel was later rebuilt and renamed Golden State. J.A. Gibbs, Shipwrecks of Juan De Fuca. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968..
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William F. Fry (steamboat)
Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers., p. 115.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William F. Garms (schooner)
The William F. Garms, a four-masted schooner of 1094 tons and 1300M capacity, was built at Everett, Wash., in 1901 by C. G. White. She was owned by Sanders & Kirchmann, and later by Olson & Mahony, San Francisco. In December 1913 she was dismasted off Flattery, bound to Santa Rosalia with lumber, but was picked up and towed to Seattle, and repaired under the ownership of the Rolph Navigation & Coal Co., and the new name Golden State. In 1920 she was sold to L. A. Scott, Mobile. The schooner Golden State was burned in 290 29' N, 85 50' W, on February 17, 1922, the crew being rescued. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William F. Garms (schooner)
The William F. Garms, a four-masted schooner of 1094 tons and 1300M capacity, was built at Everett, Wash., in 1901 by C. G. White. She was owned by Sanders & Kirchmann, and later by Olson & Mahony, San Francisco. In December 1913 she was dismasted off Flattery, bound to Santa Rosalia with lumber, but was picked up and towed to Seattle, and repaired under the ownership of the Rolph Navigation & Coal Co., and the new name Golden State. In 1920 she was sold to L. A. Scott, Mobile. The schooner Golden State was burned in 290 29' N, 85 50' W, on February 17, 1922, the crew being rescued. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William F. Garms (schooner)
Another collision occurred the same night at Port Townsend between the four-masted schooner William F. Garms and the barkentine S. G. Wilder. The Wilder had loaded lumber at Ballard and the Garms at Coupeville. Both were bound for Santa Rosalia, and their masters had challenged each other to a race, which was looked forward to with interest by maritime men. Both vessels were being towed to sea together by the tug Goliah, when the tug's hawser caught on an underwater obstruction, causing the Garms to veer into the Wilder, causing sufficient damage to the latter vessel to require several days delay in her sailing and spoiling what would have probably been a most interesting sailing race. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1913, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.232
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William F. Monroe (steamer)
The Puget Sound stern-wheeler William F. Monroe was wrecked at Sterling Bend on the Skagit River while in operation as a towboat. She was buut at Seattle in 1883 for Capt. William F. Monroe, who operated her on the Seattle, Bellingham Bay and Nooksack River route, and later in the Snohomish and Skagit Rivers trade from Seattle. During much of her career she was commanded by Capt. Curtis D. Brownfield, who was her owner for a time. She was con- verted to a towboat in 1894. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1896, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 7.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William F. Witzemann (schooner)
The William F. Witzemann, a four-masted schooner of 473 tons, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., in 1887, probably by Bendixsen for James Madison of San Francisco. The schooner was later owned by L. Fjord and was wrecked four miles north of Bolinas, California, February 5, 1907. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2. WILLIS A HOLDEN. Schooner. The Willis A. Holden, a four-masted schooner of 1188 tons and 1300 M capacity, was built at Ballard, Wash., in 1902 by T. C. Reed for the Globe Navigation Co., costing $75,000. In December, 1907, she was towed into port rudderless by the steam schooner Charles Nelson, her cargo having shifted; in February, 1911, she was dismasted on a passage from Tacoma to Valparaiso, and was repaired at San Francisco; and in February, 1914, she was picked up by the U. S. R. C. Snohomish and towed leaking to Port Townsend on a voyage from Manila. She was sold in 1914 for $20,000 to the Port Blakely Mill Co., and brought them $60,0
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William F. Witzemann (schooner)
The William F. Witzemann, a four-masted schooner of 473 tons, was built at Fairhaven, Calif., in 1887, probably by Bendixsen for James Madison of San Francisco. The schooner was later owned by L. Fjord and was wrecked four miles north of Bolinas, California, February 5, 1907. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2. WILLIS A HOLDEN. Schooner. The Willis A. Holden, a four-masted schooner of 1188 tons and 1300 M capacity, was built at Ballard, Wash., in 1902 by T. C. Reed for the Globe Navigation Co., costing $75,000. In December, 1907, she was towed into port rudderless by the steam schooner Charles Nelson, her cargo having shifted; in February, 1911, she was dismasted on a passage from Tacoma to Valparaiso, and was repaired at San Francisco; and in February, 1914, she was picked up by the U. S. R. C. Snohomish and towed leaking to Port Townsend on a voyage from Manila. She was sold in 1914 for $20,000 to the Port Blakely Mill Co., and brought them $60,
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William G. Hagstaff
Robert H. Ruby and John A. Brown. Indians of the Pacific Northwest, p. 109.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William G. Irwin (brigantine)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 167.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Bessie (bark)
July 25, 1886 Bark, built at Bath, Maine in 1873, 1027 tons, 179.9'x 36'x 36.2', valued at $31,500. Under Captain Gibbs, she sailed en route from New York with a cargo of railroad iron. She came up on the Clatsop Spit and began to fill almost immediately. The wreck lies a mile and a half out from the Lighthouse bearing E by N. Gibbs used an old chart and was minus the services of a pilot. There is a buoy at the wreck site now, aptly named Bessie Buoy. All hands were saved. Don Marshall, Ship Disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment. Portland: Binfords, 1984, p. 133-134
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Chatham (lumber Carrier)
The William H. Chatham, built at San Francisco for the Loop Lumber Company had a capacity of 1,500,000 feet of lumber, being a steel vessel 235 feet in length. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1912, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 208.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Macy
First sailing vessel on which Captain. P. A. McDonald served as an officer. Shown at dock. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 101.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Murphy (steam Schooner)
William H. Murphy, steam schooner of 1907, burned at Port-of-Spain, Trinidad November 10, having been sold to Florida owners in 1916; Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1918, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 302.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Smith
William H. Smith, a four-masted schooner of 566 tons and 750 M capacity, was built at Port Blakely by Hall Bros. for their own fleet in 1899. In July, 1917, she was sold to Burns-Philp Co., San Francisco, for $70,000, and traded to the South Pacific until 1924. The following year she was bought by the Union Fish Co., and was operated until 1937. She has since been laid up for sale at San Francisco. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Smith
The Bath -built former wooden ship William H. Smith of 1883, having pursued a varied career for a full generation on the Pacific Coast as full-rigged ship, floating cannery, coal barge, five-masted schooner and, since 1932 as a fishing barge off Monterey, California, broke from her moorings AprU 14 and stranded on the beach, becoming a total loss. She was known as Big Smit for her 1978 ton size as compared with the William H. Smith, a 566 ton vessel built by Hall Brothers who was known as Little Smit. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1933, W.H. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 425.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Smith
William H. Smith, a four-masted schooner of 566 tons and 750 M capacity, was built at Port Blakely by Hall Bros. for their own fleet in 1899. In July, 1917, she was sold to Burns-Philp Co., San Francisco, for $70,000, and traded to the South Pacific until 1924. The following year she was bought by the Union Fish Co., and was operated until 1937. She has since been laid up for sale at San Francisco. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Smith
The William H. Smith, owned since 1938 by the Alaska Salmon Co. (which bought out the Union Fish Co.) was sold to William Len Yee of San Francisco, but remained idle until taken over by the U. S. Navy later in the war. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1941, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior, 1966., p. 489.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Smith (barge)
Aground off Monterey, California, April 14, 1933. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 154.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Smith (barge)
The wooden ship William H. Smith of 1883, last in use as coal barge by the Pacific Coast Coal Co., was sold to Charles Nelson & Co., who rerigged her for the lumber trade as a five-masted schooner. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1919-1920, H.W.McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest p. 307.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Smith (floating Cannery)
The American wooden square -rigged ship William H. Smith, dismasted and all but swamped in a storm off Grays Harbor in 1910, entered another stage of her varied career in 1911, being converted to a refrigerated floating cannery for the Alaska codfishery, having been purchased by the Welding Bros. and Independent Fishing Company. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 193.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Smith (schooner)
Wm. H. Smith, Hall-built four-masted schooner of 1899, having been in use by the Navy as the training barge Mustang (used to train embryo Navy coxswains in bringing landing craft alongside), ended her wartime service badly battered and minus her masts. She was sold to California owners after a two or three year layup at San Diego, the plan being to operate her as a barge in the copra trade. She was found too far gone for this, however, and was allowed to rot away on the mudflats at San Diego. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1947, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle :Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 545.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Stevens
William H. Stevens, two-masted schooner of 146 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1869 by and for James McDonald, dropping from registry about 10 years later. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William H. Stevens
William H. Stevens, two-masted schooner of 146 tons, was built at San Francisco in 1869 by and for James McDonald, dropping from registry about 10 years later. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Irving
The William Irving was extensively overhauled at Victoria, supplied with new machinery, and set afloat March 4th. E. W. Wright, Retirement of the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company from Puget Sound, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Puget Sound. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961 [This book was written in 1895 and the years covered in this chapter are 1891 and 1892., p.392.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Irving (steamer)
Steamer William Irving. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 276. Norman R. Hacking and W. Kaye Lamb. The Princess Story a century and a half of w, p. 337.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Irving (steamer)
Capt. John Irving constructed the fine steamer William Irving, which, on May 16th,[1880] made her first trip on the Fraser, where she performed excellent service for many years. In 1891 she was extensively overhauled and equipped with new machinery. The steamer continued to run until sunk, June, 1894, near Farr's Bluff on the Fraser, the machinery alone being saved from the wreck. Captains George and Frank Odin were masters of the steamer, and J. F. Jeffcott was for many years chief engineer. E. W. Wright, Modern Propeller Steamships Appear, Oregon Railway & Navigation Company Incorporated, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.276.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Irving (steamer)
The William Irving struck a rock at Sand Bar, near Farr's Bluff on the Fraser, in June, and sank in a few minutes. An unsuccessful attempt was made to raise the steamer, and she was then abandoned and at low water stripped of her machinery. The Irving had been up the river to tow to Westminster the R. P. Rithet, which had broken her shaft the day before when rounding a sharp turn in the river. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.420.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William J. Bryant
The William J. Bryant was built in 1896 by Thomas McDonald at Hoquiam for Ben Colley. She was equipped to carry 35 passengers in the Cook Irilet trade in charge of Capt. Bion B. Whitney. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1896, H.W. McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966.[/ 4
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William J. Irwin (barkentine)
William G. Irwin, brigantine of 348 tons, was built by Turner at San Francisco in 1881 for J. D. Spreckels as a Hawaii packet, later being transferred to the Oceanic Steamship Co., which was largely owned by the Spreckels family. The brigantine appears several times in the list of fast passages her best being from San Francisco to Kahului in 8 days, 17 hours in 1881. When sold out of the Island trade, she went to the Tacoma & Roche Harbor Lime Co., they selling her for $28,000 to Capt. Alex Woodside in 1917 for the offshore copra trade. She was rerigged a three-masted schooner of 400 m capacity; was taken over a year or so later by the Bank of Italy; and was laid up at San Francisco in July, 1920, after arrival from Samoa. Two years later she was reported going to pieces rapidly, and -was shortly thereafter sold to Famous-Players-Lasky and burned at Catalina, May 15, 1926. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William J. Irwin (barkentine)
William G. Irwin, brigantine of 348 tons, was built by Turner at San Francisco in 1881 for J. D. Spreckels as a Hawaii packet, later being transferred to the Oceanic Steamship Co., which was largely owned by the Spreckels family. The brigantine appears several times in the list of fast passages her best being from San Francisco to Kahului in 8 days, 17 hours in 1881. When sold out of the Island trade, she went to the Tacoma & Roche Harbor Lime Co., they selling her for $28,000 to Capt. Alex Woodside in 1917 for the offshore copra trade. She was rerigged a three-masted schooner of 400 m capacity; was taken over a year or so later by the Bank of Italy; and was laid up at San Francisco in July, 1920, after arrival from Samoa. Two years later she was reported going to pieces rapidly, and -was shortly thereafter sold to Famous-Players-Lasky and burned at Catalina, May 15, 1926. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William J. Moran (tug)
Edward M. Brady. Tugs, towboats and towing., p. 116.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William J. Stewart (steamer)
The 1,295-ton steamship William J. Stewart, 214 x 36.1 x 15.1, was completed at Collingwood, Ontario in 1932 and was assigned to hydrographic and survey duties on the B. C. coast, replacing the 163-foot Lillooet of 1908. The latter vessel was purchased by the Pacific Salvage Co. and later rebuilt as the salvage steamer Salvage Chieftaim. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1932, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 417.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William J. Stewart (survey Steamer)
The $ 1,000,000 Canadian government hydrographic survey steamship William J. Stewart was the victim of Ripple Rock in Seymour Narrows, B. C., considered the most serious menace to navigation on the Inside Passage route to Alaska. The survey vessel, operated from Victoria, struck the rock on June 11, inflicting serious damage to her hull and barely reaching shallow water, where she sank in four fathoms. The Salvage King and derrick barge Skookum No. 2 succeeded in refloating the Stewart, which was repaired at Esquimalt. The accident to this highly specialized vessel fitted with every available navigational and hydrographic aid emphasized the dangers of the rock, located just below the surface in the narrows where tidal bores may reach a velocity of 14 knots . Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1943-1944, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 520.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William J. Stewart (survey Vessel)
William L. Worden. Cargoes, Matson First Century, p. 35.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Jolliffe (tug)
The ocean tug William Jolliffe, one of the powerful two funnel Jolliffe tugs operated out of Liverpool in the handling of large sailing vessels, was purchased by the British Columbia Salvage Co. and brought out from England under her own steam for service out of Esquimalt with the Salvor, the Maude having been chartered for government surveying work. The Jolliffe was buut of iron at South Shields, England in 1885, having dimensions of 149 x 26.2 x 14 and compound engine of 165 nominal (British) horsepower. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1909, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 141.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Jolliffe (tug)
The old Liverpool two-stack tug William Jolliffe was sold by B. C. Salvage Co. to the C. P. R., who fitted her with oil burners and an automatic towing winch and placed her in service under Capt. T. S. Guns as the Nitinat. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1914, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p.240.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William L. Beebe (schooner)
The William L. Beebe, three-masted schooner of 296 tons, was built at Port Ludlow by Hall Bros. in 1875. She was owned by J. J. Smith, San Francisco, and was commanded for a time by Capt. J. C. Eschen. In 1878 she ran from Honolulu to Port Townsend in 11 days, 18 hours. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William L. Beebe (schooner)
Wreck of Schooner William L. Beebe, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 418.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William L. Beebe (schooner)
The William L. Beebe, three-masted schooner of 296 tons, was built at Port Ludlow by Hall Bros. in 1875. She was owned by J. J. Smith, San Francisco, and was commanded for a time by Capt. J. C. Eschen. In 1878 she ran from Honolulu to Port Townsend in 11 days, 18 hours. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850- 1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William L. Beebe (schooner)
The William L. Beebe, a Puget Sound production about twenty years old, was wrecked on the ocean beach about three miles south of the Cliff House, December 10, 1894. The schooner was from Port Blakely for San Francisco, and in attempting to cross the bar struck and began pounding to pieces in the breakers. The crew were driven to the rigging and rescued by the life-saving crew. E. W. Wright. Growth of Deep-water Commerce, Great Loss of Life by Marine Disasters, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961. [Wright completed his book in 1895 and the events described occurred in 1893 and 1894.]., p.418.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats On The Western
Steamer William Louis C. Hunter. Steamboats on the Western Rivers. on Slocan Lake, 1892. Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 361.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William M Tupper (steamer)
The 1,852-ton steel steamship William M. Tupper, purchased the previous year in New Orleans by Capt. Wallace Langley of the Santa Ana Steamship Co., was brought to the coast by Capt. John E. Worth for operation in the Seattle - Kuskokwim River trade. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1925, H. W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 363.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William M. Hoag (steamer)
As a feeder to their rail and steamship lines the company constructed the river steamer William M. Hoag, a sternwheeler one hundred and fifty feet long, thirty-two feet beam, five feet six inches hold, with engines sixteen by sixty inches. She was handled by Capt. George Raabe until 1892, and then by Captains Robert Young and Miles Bell. In 1894 she was chartered by the Oregon Railway & Navigation Company and has been operated by them most of the time since. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.345.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Notthingham (schooner)
The William Nottingham, a four masted schooner of 1204 tons and 1300M feet capacity, was built by Reed at Ballard in 1902, another unit of the fleet of the Globe Navigation Co. In October, 1911, she was dismasted out of Astoria for Callao; the crew was taken off by the schooner David Evans, and the wreck was towed to Astoria by the tug Wallula and repaired. She ran from Tientsin to Puget Sound in 32 days in 1904-5. The Wm. Nottingham brought $60,000 from Norwegian o w n e r s in 1916, she having cost $75,000 to build, and the entire Globe fleet of five vessels having gone for $90,000 in 1914. In 1922 she was laid up at Port Townsend, and was converted to a barge a couple of years later. She is still afloat as a telephone cable repair barge on Puget Sound. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Notthingham (schooner)
The William Nottingham, a four masted schooner of 1204 tons and 1300M feet capacity, was built by Reed at Ballard in 1902, another unit of the fleet of the Globe Navigation Co. In October, 1911, she was dismasted out of Astoria for Callao; the crew was taken off by the schooner David Evans, and the wreck was towed to Astoria by the tug Wallula and repaired. She ran from Tientsin to Puget Sound in 32 days in 1904-5. The Wm. Nottingham brought $60,000 from Norwegian o w n e r s in 1916, she having cost $75,000 to build, and the entire Globe fleet of five vessels having gone for $90,000 in 1914. In 1922 she was laid up at Port Townsend, and was converted to a barge a couple of years later. She is still afloat as a telephone cable repair barge on Puget Sound. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Notthingham (schooner)
After an eventful voyage from Puget Sound to the Atlantic Coast, the schooner William Nottingham, Capt. Keegan, of the Globe Navigation Co., said to be the first Pacific Coast built schooner to round the Horn, arrived at New York in December. The schooner had loaded a cargo of spars at Winslow, Bainbridge Island, for the Hollow Spar Boston. She was forced to put into New York for repairs having struck an iceberg off the Falkland Islands. The passage required 160 days. Capt. Keegan, just prior sailing from Port Townsend, was stabbed several th the back by a crazed sailor, but continued in command of the vessel on her memorable voyage. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1906, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest, p. 122.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Notthingham (schooner)
The Globe Navigation Co. four-masted schooner William Nottingham, which had previously rounded the Horn with a cargo of spars for Boston, was towed to Puget Sound from San Francisco by the tug Dauntless in February, having put in at that port in distress. She was 340 days out from New York with a cargo of coal, coming by way of the Cape of Good Hope and having had to put into Melbourne, Australia for repairs. Prior to fetching up at the Golden Gate her crew had worked for 120 days at the pumps and were starved and almost exhausted when they made port. Her reinsurance was quoted at 50 per cent at the time of her arrival in charge of Capt. Lowry, but she was to survive many more near-disasters and remain as one of the last of the wooden sailing ships afloat and at work in the Pacific Northwest. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1908, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 154.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Nottingham (schooner)
October 9, 1911 Schooner, built at Ballard, Washington in 1902 and registered 1204 tons. The crew was picked tip bv the David Evans; the Wallula towed her in. At one time during her career (1908), she left New York with a cargo of coal and was 340 leaky days coming by way of the Cape of Good Hope. She put in at Melbourne for repairs, but the bone-tired crew under Captain Lowery continued to work the pumps for 120 days before reaching San Francisco. Don Marshall, Ship Disasters, Cape Falcon to Cape Disappointment. Portland: Binfords, 1984, p. 133-134
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Nottingham (schooner)
American schooner, 1,204 tons, dismasted and waterlogged in a gale off the Columbia River, October 9, 1911. Her crew was picked up by the schooner David Evans. Later the derelict was found by the tug Wallula and towed to Astoria as a prize. She underwent extensive repairs and returned to the sealanes. At the time of the accident, the Nottingham was outbound for Callao from Astoria. She was built at Ballard, Washington, for the Globe Navigation Company in 1902. Her latter years were spent as a cable barge, and in 1948, she was towed to the mouth of the Nisqually River, on Puget Sound, and sunk as a breakwater. James A. Gibbs, Jr. Pacific Graveyard. A narrative of the ships lost where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1950, p. 153-190
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Nottingham (schooner)
Dismasted and waterlogged in a gale off the Columbia River in 1911. Later used as a breakwater at the mouth of the Nisqually River. Gibbs, Pacific Graveyard, p. 188. The jinx trip of the schooner William Nottingham, Marine Digest, May 19, 1951.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Nottingham (schooner)
Another of the notable West Coast sailing vessels, the four -masted schooner William Nottingham, was purchased by the Washington Tug & Barge Co. of Seattle in 1922 and the following year was reduced to a barge for the lumber trade, the towing firm at the same time taking over the Ferris type hulls Puyallup, Ahmix and Oelwin for the same purpose. The Nottingham was purchased from the Motorseil Corporation (A/S Porsgrunde Motor & Sail) of Norway, which had acquired her from the Port Blakeley Mill Co. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922, H.W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest. p. 322.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Nottingham (schooner)
In May, 1923 the Nottingham loaded 1,200,000 feet of lumber at Tillamook, being the largest vessel to load at that port since 1907. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1921-1922, H.W. McCurdy Maritime History of the Pacific Northwest p. 322
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Nottingham (schooner)
The interest aroused by the gallant performances of the remaining sailing vessels engaged in trade from Northwest ports drew attention to the consistent work of the Ballard built schooners of the Globe Navigation Co., whose vessels had been engaged largely in the lumber trade between the Sound and Callao for the past three years. George F. Thorndyke, manager of the Globe Navigation Co., compiled figures from four voyages of the schooners William Nottingham and Wilbert L. Smith, which made several passages almost in company with each other, showing that the average time of the Nottingham was 46 days and that of the Smith 44 days. Later in the year the two Globe schooners were chartered by W. R Grace & Co., continuing to carry lumber cargoes between Northwest ports and South America. Gordon Newell, Maritime events of 1911, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 187.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Olsen (schooner)
The William Olsen, a four-masted schooner of 523 tons and 700 M capacity, was built at Alameda in 1900 by Hay & Wright, and owned by N. H. Hickman, San Francisco. In 1918-9 she sailed from San Francisco to Auckland, N. Z., in 43 days, but on the return voyage was wrecked without loss of life on Nihau Island, Hawaii, April 21, 1919. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Olsen (schooner)
The William Olsen, a four-masted schooner of 523 tons and 700 M capacity, was built at Alameda in 1900 by Hay & Wright, and owned by N. H. Hickman, San Francisco. In 1918-9 she sailed from San Francisco to Auckland, N. Z., in 43 days, but on the return voyage was wrecked without loss of life on Nihau Island, Hawaii, April 21, 1919. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William O'swald
See RESOLUTE.
Citation:
William Penn
The "William Penn" was built by Malcolmson Bros, Waterford, Ireland in 1865. She was a 2,647 gross ton ship, length 316.3ft x beam 36.3ft, clipper stem, one funnel, four masts, iron construction, single screw and a speed of 10 knots. There was accommodation for 1st, 2nd and 700-3rd class passengers. Originally laid down as the "Manhattan", she was launched on 10/7/1865 as the "William Penn" for the London & New York Steamship Line. Her maiden voyage commenced on 10/4/1866 when she left London for Havre, St John's NF and New York and she commenced the last of 18 round voyages on 13/3/1869 when she sailed from London for Havre and New York. In 1869 she went to the Allan Line of Liverpool who renamed her "European" and used her as an extra steamer on the Liverpool - Quebec - Montreal service. In 1872 she was sold to the Hughes Line of Liverpool and was employed on their Liverpool - Bombay route, but in July and October 1874 made 2 round voyages between Liverpool, Quebec and Montreal. When entering Morpeth Dock, Birkenhead in 1875, she broke her back, was rebuilt to 2,659 tons and a length of 326.8ft, and fitted with compound engines. In 1884 she was again fitted with new engines and came under the ownership of T.R.Oswald (British). Between 1889 and 1894 she was owned by the Ross Line and in 1897 was reduced to a hulk. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2, p.598] -
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 20 January 1998]
William Penn
WILLEHAD
Your ship is the "Willehad" and was built by Blohm & Voss, Hamburg in 1894 for Norddeutscher Lloyd [North German Lloyd]. She was a 4,761 gross ton ship, length 383.4ft x beam 46ft, one funnel, two masts, steel construction, twin screw and a speed of 13 knots. There was passenger accommodation for 105-2nd class and 1,196-3rd class. Launched on 21/3/1894, she sailed from Bremen on her maiden voyage to New York on 24/5/1894. On 10/11/1894 she commenced her first Bremen - South America voyage and on 4/12/1896 started her first Bremen - New York - Baltimore run. On 23/5/1903 she commenced the last of 12 round voyages to S.America and on 3/5/1904 started sailing between Stettin, Helsingborg, Gothenburg, Christiansand and New York (3 round voyages). On 31/12/1912 she started Hamburg - Quebec - Montreal sailings and on 4/1/1912 commenced Bremen - Philadelphia voyages. On 31/12/1912 she started her last sailing between Bremen, Philadelphia and Baltimore and on 10/7/1914 commenced the last of 24 round voyages when she left Hamburg for Quebec and Montreal. In Aug 1914 she took refuge in New London, Conn. due to the outbreak of the Great War and in April 1917 was seized by the US authorities. She then became the US Government ship "Wyandotte" until 1924 when she was scrapped at Baltimore. [North Atlantic Seaway by N.R.P.Bonsor, vol.2,p.558]
Citation: [Posted to The ShipsList by Ted Finch - 6 January 1998]
William Renton (schooner)
The William Renton, three-masted schooner of 447 tons and 575M lumber capacity, was built at Port Blakely in 1882 by Hall Bros., and was the largest schooner then built on this coast. She was managed at San Francisco by J. J. Smith. In 1911 she was owned by Morris Madison, San Francisco. The schooner was later owned by L. Fjord, and was wrecked 4 miles north of Bolinas, Calif., February 5, 1907. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Renton (schooner)
The William Renton, three-masted schooner of 447 tons and 575M lumber capacity, was built at Port Blakely in 1882 by Hall Bros., and was the largest schooner then built on this coast. She was managed at San Francisco by J. J. Smith. In 1911 she was owned by Morris Madison, San Francisco. The schooner was later owned by L. Fjord, and was wrecked 4 miles north of Bolinas, Calif., February 5, 1907. John Lyman, Pacific Coast-built sailers 1850-1905, The Marine Digest. September 27, 1941, p. 2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William S. Ladd (liberty Ship)
One of the last of the Pacific Northwest ships to fall victim to enemy action was the Portland-built Liberty ship William S. Ladd, operated for the War Shipping Administration by the Weyerhaeuser Steamship Co. Bombs from a Japanese plane set the freighter on fire in Leyte Gulf, where she later foundered. There was no loss of life, although six merchant seamen of her crew were hospitalized. Although most of her cargo had already been unloaded, a quantity of gasoline and ammunition remained in her holds at the time of the attack. The Ladd was commanded by Capt. Nels F. Anderson of Silverdale, Washington, who was a former mate on the C. S. Holmes under Capt. Backland and later master of the barkentines Forest Friend and Forest Pride. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1945, H.W.McCurdy, Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.,p. 528.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William T. Lewis
Built as Robert Duncan at Port Glasgow, Scotland, in 1891. Jim Gibbs, Pacific Square-riggers., p. 140.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William T. Lewis (bark)
The four-masted steel bark William T. Lewis was purchased by James Griffiths & Sons from Hind, Rolph & Co. and was converted into a hog fuel barge at the North Vancouver StApyards. Originally launched at Glasgow in 1891 as the Robert Duncan, the Lewis had an active wartime career, being abandoned by her crew and shelled by a German U - Boat while lumber - laden off the Irish coast. Her cargo kept her afloat and she was later towed to Liverpool and repaired. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1927-28, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior, 1966, p. 388.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Tabor (steamer)
Noting the success of Frank Barnard on the northern route, Nicholas Luning of San Francisco purchased the old steamship William Tabor from John T. Wright a n d prepared her for the Portland and San Francisco trade. A monthly subsidy of three thousand dollars induced him to keep the Ta bor in San Francisco. E.W. Wright, Marine business of 1881, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. (written in 1895)., p. 299.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Tabor (steamer)
Capt. John T. Wright sent his steamship William Tabor to Victoria in June, but, when Rosenfeld & Bermingham disposed of their interest in the Victoria business to Goodall, Nelson & Co., the Tabor was replaced with the steamship Los Angeles, formerly the revenue cutter Wynada. E. W. Wright, Willamette River Locks Completed, Charter Rates of the Lumber Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.218.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Taylor (barge)
William Taylor, former schooner converted to a refrigerated barge, formerly owned by Pratt's Fresh Frozen Food Co., sold to Del Mar Food Products Co. for operation in conjunction with the recently acquired motorship Southeastern in southern waters. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle Superior Publishing Company, 1966.. p. 574.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Taylor (schooner)
The one-time four-masted schooner William Taylor, also in war service as a barge, was likewise laid up in Lake Union, her future active career being limited to a single ill -fated voyage under tow. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1945, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest.Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966, p. 526.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Taylor (schooner)
The former schooner William Taylor, recently taken over for South American barge service, soon met her end, her hull being rotten and the tow south attempted by a greenhorn tug crew and worse tug. She put into San Francisco with one of the crew dead and the rest, from the tug skipper down, so frightened that they all deserted. She subseo,iaently made every port from San Francisco to Chile, and upon her arrival had to be beached to prevent her sinking. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1950-51, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Seattle: Superior Publishing Company, 1966. p. 578.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Tell
American ship, 1,500 tons, wrecked, December 23, 1865, on reef three miles northwest of Port San Juan. J.A. Gibbs, Shipwrecks of Juan De Fuca. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1968.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Tell
The American ship William Tell, Captain Jones, was wrecked on the coast of Vancouver Island, December 23, 1865. She sailed from Simonstown, August 15, 1864, and sighted land to the west of Nootka Sound, December 13th, and entered the Straits three days later, being within six miles of Dungeness lighthouse on the nineteenth. The next day the wind began to blow, and the ship drifted to the west of Race Rocks. She tried to anchor in Freshwater Bay, but could not reach it, and beat about the Straits until the twenty-second, and on the twenty-third struck a reef three miles northwest of San Juan. At low tide a line was carried ashore, one hundred fathoms away, and all of the crew of twenty-two were landed. Before deserting the vessel the mainmast was cut away to enable them to reach the reef. Bolles, the mate, was the last man to leave the wreck, at 12:00 o'clock, and at 1:00 the ship broke into a thousand pieces. The survivors were taken to Victoria by the schooner Surprise, Captain Francis. The William Tell was
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
William Vaughn (tug)
The 13-ton diesel tug William Vaughn was built by L. R. McDonald at Marshfield in 1929 for use on Coos Bay. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1929-30, H.W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 401.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Williamsberg
Clinton Snowden, History of Washington, the rise and progress of an American State. iv, 358.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Williamsburg
Among the numerous foreign vessels coming to the Sound for cargoes was the Dutch ship Williamsburg, which loaded spars for the French Navy. The cargo was secured at McDonough's Island, opposite Penn's Cove, and included one hundred spars from 80 to 120 feet in length, and measuring from thirty inches to forty-three inches in diameter. A local newspaper, in announcing the departure of the ship for Toulon in November, said, The carpenter was compelled to mutilate the vessel in a shocking manner in order to get such huge timbers on board. E. W. Wright, Puget Sound Steamboats, Golden Days of Fraser River Navigation, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd., 1961., p.61-2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library