Yaquina
May 25, 1882 Steamship, a new vessel owned by Z. J. Hatch & S. Tuthill. While berthed at Pacific Dock in Portland, her 3,600 barrels of lime ignited. She was cut loose and left to drift. Captain Denny and most of his crew fought a losing battle against the blazing inferno. They eventually towed her to shore and scuttled the $36,000, uninsured vessel. Don Marhsall, Ship disasters Columbia River, tributaries Idaho, Montana. Oregon Shipwrecks. 1985, p. 208-211.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yaquina (coast Guard)
February 20, 1935 Coast Guard Patrol Boat, valued at $20,000. The boat, true to the tradition of the United States Coast Guard, attempted to aid a disabled barge caught in the fierce breakers off the Yaquina bar. Numerous approaches were made toward the disabled, battered wreck. Finally, the smaller boat managed at great peril to work to the lee. At that moment a widow maker swept both vessels. The two seamen were washed away and the Coast Guard boat badly holed. Deadly floating planks, some broken and jagged, slammed and punched at the floundering men. George Elkins, George Meadows and William Stults of the Coast Guard lost their lives as did Vern Jackson and one unknown man from Astoria. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yaquina (research Vessel)
Yaquina, 180-foot oceanographic research vessel, formerly the Army freighter FS-210, sold by Oregon State University to Rideau Shipping Ltd. of British Columbia, with proceeds of the sale going toward the outfitting of a new $3.1 million research vessel currently under construction in Wisconsin. Gordon Newell, Maritime Events of 1975, H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest 1966 to 1975., p.191-2.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yaquina (steamer)
William Spiedel. Sons of the profits., p. 177-178, 185. Edwin Culp. Stations West, the story of Oregon Railways., p. 84.
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Yaquina (steamer)
The upper works of the new steamer Yaquina were burned at Portland, May 25th, but were afterward rebuilt. E. W. Wright, Marine business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest., p. 302.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yaquina (steamer)
The steamship Yaquina was built at Portland by E. Sorenson for Z. J. Hatch and D. S. Tuthill. She made her trial trip December 23, 1881 in command of Capt. J. E. Denny. After a few voyages in the coasting trade, a lime cargo fired her while coming up the Columbia in May, 1882. She reached her destination, the Pacific dock, Portland, where a futile attempt was made to smother the fire in the hold, but several hours later the upper works were ablaze. She was cut loose from the wharf and towed to the east side of the river by the steamer Lurline, where she was scuttled. The hull and machinery were saved in a damaged condition, and she was afterward rebuilt and commenced running in August in charge of Capt. E. J. Moody and Engineer A. Bocbau, but a month later was sold to the Pacific Coast Steamship Company, who operated her on southern routes out of San Francisco. E. W. Wright, Marine Business of 1881, Lewis and Drydens Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. (Written in 1895)., p. 283.
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Yaquina Bay (schooner)
December 9, 1888 Steam schooner, 257'x 34'x 21', built by Cramp & Sons in 1881 as the Caracas. While under tow, the hawser parted and she went ashore at Yaquina. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yaquina Bay (steamer)
The Oregon Pacific Railway replaced the lost Yaquina City with the new steamship Yaquina Bay, built by Cramp & Sons in 1881. She was a handsome vessel two hundred and fifty-seven feet long, thirty-four feet beam, and twenty-one feet hold, registering 1,200 tons, but was unfortunately wrecked on her first trip, December 10th. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.353.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yaquina Bay (steamer)
The steamship Yaquina Bay was wrecked at Yaquina, December 9th. She had just arrived from the East to take the place of the Yaquina City, wrecked the previous year, and was in command of Captain Lord, who had brought her out from the East. The Yaquina Bay was built by Cramp & Sons in 1881 for the New York and West India trade, where she was known as the Caracas. Her dimensions were: length, two hundred and fifty-seven feet; beam, thirty-four feet; depth of hold, twenty-one feet. The disaster was caused by the parting of a hawser by which the tug was towing her in. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.360.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yaquina City (steamer)
December 4, 1887 Steamer, owned by Oregon Development Co. This ship and the Yaquina Bay went ashore at the same place, a year apart. The wreck of the Yaquina City was caused by broken wheel chains. The loss of the two ships was more than the new company could absorb and the Oregon Development Co. went belly up. Don Marshall, Ship disasters, Umpqua River to Salmon River. Oregon Shipwrecks. Portland: Binfords and Mort, 1984, p. 72-75.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yaquina City (steamer)
The Oregon Pacific steamship Yaquina City parted her wheel chains while entering Yaquina harbor, December 4th, and drifted ashore, becoming a total loss eight days later. E. W. Wright, Large Increase in British Columbia's Inland and Ocean Steam Fleet, Lewis & Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. New York: Antiquarian Press, Ltd.,1961 [Wright originally wrote in 1895. Events in this chapter occurred in 1888.]., p.350.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library
Yaquina City (steamer)
The Oregon Pacific Railroad, which bad commenced operations at Yaquina Bay, brought the steamship Yaquina City to the Pacific Coast early in 1884 and commenced operating her between San Francisco and the Oregon ports in connedction with their railroad. The steamer was an old-timer in the gulf trade on the eastern coast, where she ran under the name Western Texas. She was wrecked at Yaquina Bay in 1887. E.W. Wright, Maritime business of 1884, Lewis and Dryden's Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. [Written in 1895].. p. 324.
Citation: Tacoma Public Library